Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

A history of gamma ray bursts and other astronomical conundrums

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2207851Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

The 24 years between the announcement of "gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin" (1973) and the unambiguously cosmological 970228 seemed very long to the generation that lived through them. For a good many astronomical phenomena, however, the interval between the recognition of a puzzle and convergence of the community on a solution was even longer. Examples include periodic variable stars and coronal lines from the sun. In other cases, the right idea has appeared very soon after discovery, pulsars and quasars, for instance. Sometimes, on the other hand, the theorists are out in front with an explanation in advance of the discovery. This is called a prediction, and some have come very far in advance (heliocentric parallax surely holds the record), others only a few years (superluminal motion in quasars, for example). The talk and this paper explore a few examples of each class as a framework for the much-told GRB story. © 2006 American Institute of Physics.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC Academic Senate's Open Access Policy. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
Current View