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Pharmacometabolomic signature of ataxia SCA1 mouse model and lithium effects.

  • Author(s): Perroud, Bertrand
  • Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan
  • Wikoff, William R
  • Gatchel, Jennifer R
  • Wang, Lu
  • Barupal, Dinesh K
  • Crespo-Barreto, Juan
  • Fiehn, Oliver
  • Zoghbi, Huda Y
  • Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima
  • et al.
Abstract

We have shown that lithium treatment improves motor coordination in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) disease mouse model (Sca1(154Q/+)). To learn more about disease pathogenesis and molecular contributions to the neuroprotective effects of lithium, we investigated metabolomic profiles of cerebellar tissue and plasma from SCA1-model treated and untreated mice. Metabolomic analyses of wild-type and Sca1(154Q/+) mice, with and without lithium treatment, were performed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and BinBase mass spectral annotations. We detected 416 metabolites, of which 130 were identified. We observed specific metabolic perturbations in Sca1(154Q/+) mice and major effects of lithium on metabolism, centrally and peripherally. Compared to wild-type, Sca1(154Q/+) cerebella metabolic profile revealed changes in glucose, lipids, and metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and purines. Fewer metabolic differences were noted in Sca1(154Q/+) mouse plasma versus wild-type. In both genotypes, the major lithium responses in cerebellum involved energy metabolism, purines, unsaturated free fatty acids, and aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids. The largest metabolic difference with lithium was a 10-fold increase in ascorbate levels in wild-type cerebella (p<0.002), with lower threonate levels, a major ascorbate catabolite. In contrast, Sca1(154Q/+) mice that received lithium showed no elevated cerebellar ascorbate levels. Our data emphasize that lithium regulates a variety of metabolic pathways, including purine, oxidative stress and energy production pathways. The purine metabolite level, reduced in the Sca1(154Q/+) mice and restored upon lithium treatment, might relate to lithium neuroprotective properties.

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