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A new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system for human hepatic triglyceride lipase.

  • Author(s): Miyashita, Kazuya
  • Kobayashi, Junji
  • Imamura, Shigeyuki
  • Kinoshita, Noriaki
  • Stanhope, Kimber L
  • Havel, Peter J
  • Nakajima, Katsuyuki
  • Machida, Tetsuo
  • Sumino, Hiroyuki
  • Nara, Makoto
  • Murakami, Masami
  • et al.
Abstract

Background

The objective of this study was to establish a new sandwich based enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring the protein mass of human hepatic triacylglyceride lipase (HTGL).

Method

Two mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against human HTGL were used for the sandwich ELISA. The post-heparin plasma (PHP) samples obtained at a heparin dose of 50 unit/kg from 124 normolipidemic subjects were used for this ELISA.

Results

The dynamic assay range of the developed ELISA for the HTGL was from 0.47 to 30 ng/ml. The CV was <7% in both intra- and inter-assays, and it did not cross-react with lipoprotein lipase or endothelial lipase (EL). The HTGL concentration in PHP showed a strong correlation with HTGL activity [n=121, r=0.778, p<0.001]. There was a weak relation of HTGL concentration against high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [n=123, r=-0.229, p=0.011] but no relations against total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), small dense LDL, remnant like particles cholesterol (RLP-C) and RLP-TG were confirmed. Interestingly, a weak but positive correlation between HTGL concentration and EL concentration was shown [n=122, p=0.013, r=0.224].

Conclusion

These results indicate that this new sandwich ELISA for measuring HTGL concentration in PHP can be applied in a daily clinical practice.

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