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Mixed-method analysis of program leader perspectives on the sustainment of multiple child evidence-based practices in a system-driven implementation.

  • Author(s): Rodriguez, Adriana
  • Lau, Anna S
  • Wright, Blanche
  • Regan, Jennifer
  • Brookman-Frazee, Lauren
  • et al.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:Understanding program leader perspectives on the sustainment of evidence-based practice (EBP) in community mental health settings is essential to improving implementation. To date, however, much of the literature has focused on direct service provider perspectives on EBP implementation. The aim of this mixed-method study was to identify factors associated with the sustainment of multiple EBPs within a system-driven implementation effort in children's mental health services. METHODS:Data were gathered from 186 leaders at 59 agencies within the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health who were contracted to deliver one of six EBPs within the Prevention and Early Intervention initiative. RESULTS:Multi-level analyses of quantitative survey data (N = 186) revealed a greater probability of leader-reported EBP sustainment in large agencies and when leaders held more positive perceptions toward the EBP. Themes from semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted with a subset of survey participants (n = 47) expanded quantitative findings by providing detail on facilitating conditions in larger agencies and aspects of EBP fit that were perceived to lead to greater sustainment, including perceived fit with client needs, implementation requirements, aspects of the organizational workforce, availability of trainings, and overall therapist attitudes about EBPs. CONCLUSIONS:Findings inform EBP implementation efforts regarding decisions around organizational-level supports and promotion of EBP fit.

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