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Biaxial Residual Stress Mapping for a Dissimilar Metal Welded Nozzle

  • Author(s): Hill, MR;
  • Olson, MD;
  • DeWald, AT
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4031504
Abstract

This paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a nozzle mockup having two welds, one a dissimilar metal (DM) weld and the other a stainless steel (SS) weld. The mockup is cylindrical, designed to represent a pressurizer surge nozzle of a nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR), and was fabricated as part of a weld residual stress measurement and finite-element (FE) modeling round-robin exercise. The mockup has a nickel alloy DM weld joining an SS safe end to a low-alloy steel cylinder and stiffening ring, as well as an SS weld joining the safe end to a section of SS pipe. The biaxial mapping experiments follow an approach described earlier, in PVP2012-78885 and PVP2013-97246, and comprise a series of experimental steps and a computation to determine a two dimensional map of biaxial (axial and hoop) residual stress near the SS and DM welds. Specifically, the biaxial stresses are a combination of a contour measurement of hoop stress in the cylinder, slitting measurements of axial stress in thin slices removed from the cylinder wall, and a computation that determines the axial stress induced by measured hoop stress. At the DM weld, hoop stress is tensile near the OD (240 MPa) and compressive at the ID (-320 MPa), and axial stress is tensile near the OD (370 MPa) and compressive near the midthickness (-230 MPa) and ID (-250 MPa). At the SS weld, hoop stress is tensile near the OD (330 MPa) and compressive near the ID (-210 MPa), and axial stress is tensile at the OD (220 MPa) and compressive near midthickness (-225 MPa) and ID (-30 MPa). The measured stresses are found to be consistent with earlier work in similar configurations.

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