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Conservative Management of High-grade Renal Trauma Does Not Lead to Prolonged Hospital Stay

  • Author(s): Hampson, LA
  • Radadia, KD
  • Odisho, AY
  • McAninch, JW
  • Breyer, BN
  • et al.
Abstract

To evaluate the effect of conservative management of high-grade renal trauma on length of hospitalization, we aim to describe characteristics of patients with high-grade renal trauma that are associated with an increased length of stay (LOS) and the effect of conservative vs surgical management on hospital LOS.A retrospective review of all patients who suffered unilateral high-grade renal trauma (grade 3 or higher) from September 1977 to August 2012 at San Francisco General Hospital in San Francisco, CA was performed. Patients' demographic information, mechanism of injury, injury grade, data about associated injuries, hospital LOS, and management were collected. Descriptive analysis was performed using chi-square, ordered logistic regression, and linear regression analysis. Multivariable analysis was performed using a Fine-Gray model of competing risks survival analysis, adjusting for trauma type, grade, surgery, associated injury, and complications.The cohort consisted of 408 patients with high-grade unilateral renal trauma of which 257 patients underwent renal exploration. The adjusted multivariable analysis revealed that trauma type, injury grades, nongenitourinary surgery, associated injuries, and complications were associated with increased hospital LOS (P <.01 for all). Renal exploration compared to conservative management for high-grade renal trauma was not associated with an increased hospital LOS (P = .10).There is no significant difference between conservative and surgical management of high-grade renal trauma in terms of hospital LOS. Conservative management of high-grade renal trauma does not impact patients' length of hospitalization.

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