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Death receptor 5 expression is inversely correlated with prostate cancer progression.

  • Author(s): Hernandez-Cueto, Angeles
  • Hernandez-Cueto, Daniel
  • Antonio-Andres, Gabriela
  • Mendoza-Marin, Marisela
  • Jimenez-Gutierrez, Carlos
  • Sandoval-Mejia, Ana Lilia
  • Mora-Campos, Rosario
  • Gonzalez-Bonilla, Cesar
  • Vega, Mario I
  • Bonavida, Benjamin
  • Huerta-Yepez, Sara
  • et al.
Abstract

Prostate carcinoma (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in men. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been widely used to predict the outcome of PCa and screening with PSA has resulted in a decline in mortality. However, PSA is not an optimal prognostic tool as its sensitivity may be too low to reduce morbidity and mortality. Consequently, there is a demand for additional robust biomarkers for prostate cancer. Death receptor 5 (DR5) has been implicated in the prognosis of several cancers and it has been previously shown that it is negatively regulated by Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in prostate cancer cell lines. The present study investigated the clinical significance of DR5 expression in a prostate cancer patient cohort and its correlation with YY1 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression distribution was performed using tissue microarray constructs from 54 primary PCa and 39 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) specimens. DR5 expression was dramatically reduced as a function of higher tumor grade. By contrast, YY1 expression was elevated in PCa tumors as compared with that in PIN, and was increased with higher tumor grade. DR5 had an inverse correlation with YY1 expression. Bioinformatic analyses corroborated these data. The present findings suggested that DR5 and YY1 expression levels may serve as progression biomarkers for prostate cancer.

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