Will I Be Victimized at School Today? How Schools Influence the Victimization Experiences of Asian American Teenagers
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Will I Be Victimized at School Today? How Schools Influence the Victimization Experiences of Asian American Teenagers

Abstract

Schools can play an influential role in the victimization experiences of Asian American youth. We investigated the extent to which characteristics of schools—their disciplinary structure, guardianship role, and the opportunities for exposure to victimization they provide—related to whether Asian American adolescents were physically or socially victimized. Our sample included 1,303 adolescents (M age = 14.8 years) from six waves of the School Crime Supplement of the National Crime Victimization Survey. Results from logistic regression models show that disciplinary structure and guardianship, in the form of school security measures, were unrelated to victimization. Asian American adolescents with supportive peers had lower odds of physical victimization (odds ratio [OR] = 0.16; p < .01) while those exposed to school gangs and physical fights had higher odds of social victimization (OR = 2.90; p < .001 and OR = 4.97; p < .01, respectively). Our findings underscore the need for schools to consider strategies beyond commonplace school disciplinary structures and security measures to protect Asian American adolescents from victimization.

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