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Solitary noninfiltrating angiolipoma on the finger, an unusual localization.

  • Author(s): Karaali, Muge Gore
  • Polat, Asude Kara
  • Koku Aksu, Ayse Esra
  • Leblebici, Cem
  • Gurel, Mehmet Salih
  • et al.
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

Angiolipoma, a subtype of lipoma, is a benign adypocytic soft tissue tumor composed of mature adipose tissue and small vascular proliferations. This entity makes up 5–17% of all lipomas. The diagnosis is made by clinical and pathological examination, ultrasonography, and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is generally an encapsulated tumor (noninfiltrative), but rarely has an infiltrative form. Angiolipoma mostly occurs on the trunk and extremities with male predominance. The forearm is the most frequent location for angiolipomas. It is very rarely seen on the fingers. Herein, we report a patient with solitary noninfiltrating angiolipoma on a finger. The patient was treated with surgical excision and no recurrence has been noted over one year of observation.

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