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SNP genotyping using TaqMan® technology: The CYP2D6∗17 assay conundrum

  • Author(s): Gaedigk, A
  • Freeman, N
  • Hartshorne, T
  • Riffel, AK
  • Irwin, D
  • Bishop, JR
  • Stein, MA
  • Newcorn, JH
  • Jaime, LKM
  • Cherner, M
  • Leeder, JS
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1038/srep09257
Abstract

© 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved. CYP2D6 contributes to the metabolism of many clinically used drugs and is increasingly tested to individualize drug therapy. The CYP2D6 gene is challenging to genotype due to the highly complex nature of its gene locus. TaqMan® technology is widely used in the clinical and research settings for genotype analysis due to assay reliability, low cost, and the availability of commercially available assays. The assay identifying 1023C>T (rs28371706) defining a reduced function (CYP2D6∗17) and several nonfunctional alleles, produced a small number of unexpected diplotype calls in three independent sets of samples, i.e. calls suggested the presence of a CYP2D6∗4 subvariant containing 1023C>T. Gene resequencing did not reveal any unknown SNPs in the primer or probe binding sites in any of the samples, but all affected samples featured a trio of SNPs on their CYP2D6∗4 allele between one of the PCR primer and probe binding sites. While the phenomenon was ultimately overcome by an alternate assay utilizing a PCR primer excluding the SNP trio, the mechanism causing this phenomenon remains elusive. This rare and unexpected event underscores the importance of assay validation in samples representing a variety of genotypes, but also vigilance of assay performance in highly polymorphic genes such as CYP2D6.

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