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Sun protection practices and sun exposure among children with a parental history of melanoma

  • Author(s): Glenn, BA
  • Lin, T
  • Chang, LC
  • Okada, A
  • Wong, WK
  • Glanz, K
  • Bastani, R
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/24/1/169.full.pdf+html
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2014 American Association for Cancer Research. Background: First-degree relatives of melanoma survivors have a substantially higher lifetime risk for melanoma than individuals with no family history. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the primary modifiable risk factor for the disease. Reducing UV exposure through sun protection may be particularly important for children with a parental history of melanoma. Nonetheless, limited prior research has investigated sun protection practices and sun exposure among these children. Methods: The California Cancer Registry was used to identify melanoma survivors eligible to participate in a survey to assess their children's sun protection practices and sun exposure. The survey was administered by mail, telephone, or web to Latino and non-Latino white melanoma survivors with at least one child (0-17 years; N = 324). Results: Sun exposure was high and the rate of sunburn was equivalent to or higher than estimates from average-risk populations. Use of sun protection was suboptimal. Latino children were less likely to wear sunscreen and hats and more likely to wear sunglasses, although these differences disappeared in adjusted analyses. Increasing age of the child was associated with lower sun protection and higher risk for sunburn, whereas higher objective risk for melanoma predicted improved sun protection and a higher risk for sunburns. Perception of high barriers to sun protection was the strongest modifiable correlate of sun protection. Conclusions: Interventions to improve sun protection and reduce sun exposure and sunburns in high-risk children are needed. Impact: Intervening in high-risk populations may help reduce the burden of melanoma in the United States.

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