Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley Previously Published Works bannerUC Berkeley

Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopic study of conical intersection dynamics: an experimental and electronic structure study.

  • Author(s): Wu, Eric C;
  • Ge, Qinghui;
  • Arsenault, Eric A;
  • Lewis, Nicholas HC;
  • Gruenke, Natalie L;
  • Head-Gordon, Martin J;
  • Fleming, Graham R
  • et al.
Abstract

The relaxation from the lowest singlet excited state of the triphenylmethane dyes, crystal violet and malachite green, is studied via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy. After excitation of the dyes at their respective absorption maxima, the ensuing excited state dynamics are tracked by monitoring the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C aromatic stretch. With the aid of electronic structure calculations, the observed transitions in the 2DEV spectra are assigned to specific geometries and a detailed story of the evolution of the nuclear wavepacket as it diffuses on the excited state potential energy surface (PES) and ultimately passes through the conical intersection is developed. Notably, it is revealed that the relaxation of the lowest singlet excited state involves intramolecular charge transfer while the nuclear wavepacket is on the excited state PES. Finally, through analyzing the center line slopes of the measured peaks, we show how both solvent motions and changes in the molecular dipole moment affect the correlation between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. This work clearly demonstrates the usefulness of 2DEV spectroscopy in following the motion of nuclear wavepackets after photoexcitation and in studying the interactions between the molecular dipole moment and surrounding solvent environment.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
For improved accessibility of PDF content, download the file to your device.
Current View