Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

UCLA

UCLA Previously Published Works bannerUCLA

Effect of 12 weeks of once-daily tiotropium/olodaterol on exercise endurance during constant work-rate cycling and endurance shuttle walking in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  • Author(s): Maltais, François;
  • O'Donnell, Denis;
  • Gáldiz Iturri, Juan Bautista;
  • Kirsten, Anne-Marie;
  • Singh, Dave;
  • Hamilton, Alan;
  • Tetzlaff, Kay;
  • Zhao, Yihua;
  • Casaburi, Richard
  • et al.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:The TORRACTO® study evaluated the effects of tiotropium/olodaterol versus placebo on endurance time during constant work-rate cycling and constant speed shuttle walking in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after 12 weeks of treatment. METHODS:The effects of once-daily tiotropium/olodaterol (2.5/5 and 5/5 μg) on endurance time during constant work-rate cycle ergometry (CWRCE) after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment were compared with placebo in patients with COPD in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group clinical trial. Endurance time during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment was also evaluated in a subset of patients. RESULTS:A total of 404 patients received treatment, with 165 participating in the ESWT substudy. A statistically significant improvement in endurance time during CWRCE was observed after 12 weeks (primary endpoint) with tiotropium/olodaterol 5/5 µg [14% ( p = 0.02)] but not with tiotropium/olodaterol 2.5/5 µg [9% ( p = 0.14)] versus placebo. In the ESWT substudy, a trend to improvement in endurance time during ESWT after 12 weeks (key secondary endpoint) was observed with tiotropium/olodaterol 5/5 µg [21% ( p = 0.055)] and tiotropium/olodaterol 2.5/5 µg [21% ( p = 0.056)] versus placebo. CONCLUSION:Tiotropium/olodaterol 5/5 µg improved endurance time during cycle ergometry versus placebo, with a strong tendency to also improve walking endurance time. [ ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01525615.].

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
For improved accessibility of PDF content, download the file to your device.
Current View