Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Internship Experiences Contribute to Confident Career Decision Making for Doctoral Students in the Life Sciences.

  • Author(s): Schnoes, Alexandra M
  • Caliendo, Anne
  • Morand, Janice
  • Dillinger, Teresa
  • Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle
  • Moses, Bruce
  • Gibeling, Jeffery C
  • Yamamoto, Keith R
  • Lindstaedt, Bill
  • McGee, Richard
  • O'Brien, Theresa C
  • et al.
Abstract

The Graduate Student Internships for Career Exploration (GSICE) program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), offers structured training and hands-on experience through internships for a broad range of PhD-level careers. The GSICE program model was successfully replicated at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). Here, we present outcome data for a total of 217 PhD students participating in the UCSF and UC Davis programs from 2010 to 2015 and 2014 to 2015, respectively. The internship programs at the two sites demonstrated comparable participation, internship completion rates, and overall outcomes. Using survey, focus group, and individual interview data, we find that the programs provide students with career development skills, while increasing students' confidence in career exploration and decision making. Internships, in particular, were perceived by students to increase their ability to discern a career area of choice and to increase confidence in pursuing that career. We present data showing that program participation does not change median time to degree and may help some trainees avoid "default postdocs." Our findings suggest important strategies for institutions developing internship programs for PhD students, namely: including a structured training component, allowing postgraduation internships, and providing a central organization point for internship programs.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
Current View