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Classifying Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia 2 Based on LAST Recommendations.

  • Author(s): Liu, Yuxin
  • McCluggage, W Glenn
  • Darragh, Teresa M
  • Zheng, Wenxin
  • Roberts, Jennifer M
  • Park, Kay J
  • Hui, Pei
  • Blakely, Morgan
  • Sigel, Keith
  • Gaisa, Michael M
  • et al.
Abstract

Objectives

The Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) recommendations classify human papillomavirus-associated squamous lesions into low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs/HSILs). Our study aimed to assess interobserver agreement among 6 experienced pathologists in assigning 40 anal lesions previously diagnosed as anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (AIN 2) to either HSIL or non-HSIL categories.

Methods

Agreement based on photomicrographs of H&E alone or H&E plus p16 immunohistochemistry was calculated using κ coefficients.

Results

Agreement was fair based on H&E alone (κ = 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.52). Adding p16 improved agreement to moderate (κ = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.54-0.62). On final diagnosis, 21 cases (53%) had unanimous diagnoses, and 19 (47%) were divided. When designating p16 results as positive or negative, agreement was excellent (κ = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83-0.95). Among variables (staining location, extent, and intensity), staining of the basal/parabasal layers was a consistent feature in cases with consensus for positive results (20/20). Of the 67 H&E diagnoses with conflicting p16 results, participants modified 32 (48%), downgrading 23 HSILs and upgrading 9 non-HSILs.

Conclusions

Although p16 increased interobserver agreement, disagreement remained considerable regarding intermediate lesions. p16 expression, particularly if negative, can reduce unwarranted HSIL diagnoses and unnecessary treatment.

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