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Clinical presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Asian-Americans versus non-Asian-Americans

  • Author(s): Wong, PY
  • Xia, V
  • Imagawa, DK
  • Hoefs, J
  • Hu, KQ
  • et al.
Abstract

The incidence of HCC is rising worldwide. Studies on ethnicity-based clinical presentation of HCC remain limited. The aim is to compare the clinical presentation and stage of HCC between Asian-Americans and non-Asian-Americans. This retrospective study assessed ethnicity-based differences in HCC presentation, including demographics, laboratory results, diagnosis of underlying liver disease, and stage of HCC. Of 276 patients, 162 were Asian-Americans and 114 were non-Asian-Americans. Compared to non-Asian-Americans, Asian-Americans had a significantly higher incidence of history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (55.0% vs. 4.9%, P<0.001), family history of HBV infection (12.5% vs. 0.0%, P<0.001) and HCC (15.2% vs. 2.9%, P = 0.002), but lower incidence of history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (37.5% vs. 61.6%, P<0.001). At diagnosis of HCC, Asian-American patients had a significantly lower frequency of hepatic encephalopathy (8.9% vs. 29.3%, P = 0.001), and ascites (26.7% vs. 57.3%, P<0.001). Asian-Americans had lower Child-Pugh scores (class A: 62.0% vs. 31.4%, P<0.001), and MELD scores (9.2 ± 4.4 vs. 12.0 ± 6.4, P = 0.02), and presented with a lower stage of HCC by Okuda staging (I: 43.8% vs. 22.8%, P = 0.001). Asian-American patients with HCC presented with a higher incidence of history and family history of HBV infection, lower incidence of hepatic decompensation, lower Child and MELD scores, and an early stage HCC disease. © The Author(s) 2010.

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