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Cost-effective ecological restoration

  • Author(s): Kimball, S
  • Lulow, M
  • Lulow, M
  • Sorenson, Q
  • Balazs, K
  • Balazs, K
  • Fang, YC
  • Davis, SJ
  • O'Connell, M
  • Huxman, TE
  • Huxman, TE
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1111/rec.12261
Abstract

© 2015 Society for Ecological Restoration Ecological restoration is a multibillion dollar industry critical for improving degraded habitat. However, most restoration is conducted without clearly defined success measures or analysis of costs. Outcomes are influenced by environmental conditions that vary across space and time, yet such variation is rarely considered in restoration planning. Here, we present a cost-effectiveness analysis of terrestrial restoration methods to determine how practitioners may restore the highest native plant cover per dollar spent. We recorded costs of 120 distinct methods and described success in terms of native versus non-native plant germination, growth, cover, and density. We assessed effectiveness using a basic, commonly used metric (% native plant cover) and developed an index of cost-effectiveness (% native cover per dollar spent on restoration). We then evaluated success of multiple methods, given environmental variation across topography and multiple years, and found that the most successful method for restoring high native plant cover is often different from the method that results in the largest area restored per dollar expended, given fixed mitigation budgets. Based on our results, we developed decision-making trees to guide practitioners through established phases of restoration-site preparation, seeding and planting, and maintenance. We also highlight where additional research could inform restoration practice, such as improved seasonal weather forecasts optimizing allocation of funds in time or valuation practices that include costs of specific outcomes in the collection of in lieu fees.

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