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Perceived barriers to pre-exposure prophylaxis use among HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Tijuana, Mexico: A latent class analysis.

  • Author(s): Patrick, Rudy
  • Jain, Jennifer
  • Harvey-Vera, Alicia
  • Semple, Shirley J
  • Rangel, Gudelia
  • Patterson, Thomas L
  • Pines, Heather A
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6705824/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:Given the slow uptake of PrEP among cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income countries, efforts to roll-out PrEP in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) should address barriers to PrEP use to facilitate its more rapid uptake. To inform PrEP programs in LMIC, we examined patterns of perceived barriers to PrEP use among HIV-negative MSM in Tijuana, Mexico. METHODS:From 03/2016-09/2017, 364 MSM completed interviewer-administered surveys assessing perceived barriers to PrEP use across 4 domains: PrEP attribute, individual, interpersonal, and structural. Latent class analysis was performed to identify distinct classes with respect to perceived barriers to PrEP use. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with class membership. RESULTS:We identified three classes characterized by (1) high levels of perceived barriers across domains (12%), (2) low levels of perceived barriers across domains (43%), and (3) perceived PrEP attribute barriers (i.e., side-effects and cost) (45%). Membership in the high level of perceived barriers class (vs. the low level of perceived barriers class) was positively associated with having a history of incarceration (AOR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.04, 5.73) and negatively associated with more social support (AOR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.00). Membership in the perceived PrEP attribute barriers class was positively associated with having seen a healthcare provider in the past year (AOR: 2.78; 95% CI: 1.41, 5.45) and negatively associated with having any HIV-positive or status unknown partners (AOR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.31, 1.01). CONCLUSIONS:Since most participants were in either the low level of perceived barriers class or the perceived PrEP attribute barriers class, future PrEP uptake may be high among MSM in Tijuana. However, these findings suggest that achieving sufficient PrEP uptake and adherence among MSM in Tijuana may require a range of comprehensive HIV prevention interventions.

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