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Identification of AMP-activated protein kinase targets by a consensus sequence search of the proteome

  • Author(s): Marin, TL
  • Gongol, B
  • Martin, M
  • King, SJ
  • Smith, L
  • Johnson, DA
  • Subramaniam, S
  • Chien, S
  • Shyy, JYJ
  • et al.
Abstract

© 2015 applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by cellular perturbations associated with ATP depletion or stress. While AMPK modulates the activity of a variety of targets containing a specific phosphorylation consensus sequence, the number of AMPK targets and their influence over cellular processes is currently thought to be limited. Results: We queried the human and the mouse proteomes for proteins containing AMPK phosphorylation consensus sequences. Integration of this database into Gaggle software facilitated the construction of probable AMPK-regulated networks based on known and predicted molecular associations. In vitro kinase assays were conducted for preliminary validation of 12 novel AMPK targets across a variety of cellular functional categories, including transcription, translation, cell migration, protein transport, and energy homeostasis. Following initial validation, pathways that include NAD synthetase 1 (NADSYN1) and protein kinase B (AKT2) were hypothesized and experimentally tested to provide a mechanistic basis for AMPK regulation of cell migration and maintenance of cellular NAD+concentrations during catabolic processes. Conclusions: This study delineates an approach that encompasses both in silico procedures and in vitro experiments to produce testable hypotheses for AMPK regulation of cellular processes.

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