Machine Learning-Based Modeling and Operation of Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Hafnium Oxide Thin Films
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Machine Learning-Based Modeling and Operation of Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Hafnium Oxide Thin Films

  • Author(s): Chung, Ho Yeon
  • Advisor(s): Christofides, Panagiotis
  • et al.
Abstract

Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) has demonstrated its superiority at coatingultra-conformal high dielectric thin-films, which are essential to the fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs) as well as the advanced 3D V-NAND (vertical Not-AND) flash memory cells. Despite the growing research interest, the exploration of the optimal operation policies for PEALD remains a complicated and expensive task. Our previous work has constructed a comprehensive 3D multiscale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the PEALD process and demonstrated its potential to enhance the understanding of the process. Nevertheless, the limitation of computational resources and the relatively long computation time restrict the efficient exploration of the operating space and the optimal operating strategy. Thus, in this work, we apply a 2D axisymmetric reduction of the previous 3D model of PEALD reactors with and without the showerhead design. Furthermore, a data-driven model is derived based on a recurrent neural network (RNN) for process characterization. The developed integrated data-driven model is demonstrated to accurately characterize the key aspects of the deposition process as well as the gas-phase transport profile while maintaining computational efficiency. The derived data-driven model is further validated with the results from a full 3D multiscale CFD model to evaluate model discrepancy. Using the data-driven model, an operational strategy database is generated, from which the optimal operating conditions can be determined for the deposition of HfO2 thin-film based on an elementary cost analysis.

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