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Chromosome bin map of expressed sequence tags in homoeologous group 1 of hexaploid wheat and homoeology with rice and arabidopsis

  • Author(s): Peng, JH
  • Zadeh, H
  • Lazo, GR
  • Gustafson, JP
  • Chao, S
  • Anderson, OD
  • Qi, LL
  • Echalier, B
  • Gill, BS
  • Dilbirligi, M
  • Sandhu, D
  • Gill, KS
  • Greene, RA
  • Sorrells, ME
  • Akhunov, ED
  • Dvořák, J
  • Linkiewicz, AM
  • Dubcovsky, J
  • Hossain, KG
  • Kalavacharla, V
  • Kianian, SF
  • Mahmoud, AA
  • Miftahudin
  • Conley, EJ
  • Anderson, JA
  • Pathan, MS
  • Nguyen, HT
  • McGuire, PE
  • Qualset, CO
  • Lapitan, NLV
  • et al.
Abstract

A total of 944 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generated 2212 EST loci mapped to homoeologous group 1 chromosomes in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). EST deletion maps and the consensus map of group 1 chromosomes were constructed to show EST distribution. EST loci were unevenly distributed among chromosomes 1A, 1B, and ID with 660, 826, and 726, respectively. The number of EST loci was greater on the long arms than on the short arms for all three chromosomes. The distribution of ESTs along chromosome arms was nonrandom with EST clusters occurring in the distal regions of short arms and middle regions of long arms. Duplications of group 1 ESTs in other homoeologous groups occurred at a rate of 35.5%. Seventy-five percent of wheat chromosome 1 ESTs had significant matches with rice sequences (E ≤ e-10), where large regions of conservation occurred between wheat consensus chromosome 1 and rice chromosome 5 and between the proximal portion of the long arm of wheat consensus chromosome 1 and rice chromosome 10. Only 9.5% of group 1 ESTs showed significant matches to Arabidopsis genome sequences. The results presented are useful for gene mapping and evolutionary and comparative genomics of grasses.

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