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Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induce antitumour T-cell immunity.

  • Author(s): Carmi, Yaron
  • Spitzer, Matthew H
  • Linde, Ian L
  • Burt, Bryan M
  • Prestwood, Tyler R
  • Perlman, Nicola
  • Davidson, Matthew G
  • Kenkel, Justin A
  • Segal, Ehud
  • Pusapati, Ganesh V
  • Bhattacharya, Nupur
  • Engleman, Edgar G
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877172/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Whereas cancers grow within host tissues and evade host immunity through immune-editing and immunosuppression, tumours are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumours are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumour and host share the same major histocompatibility complex alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection. How such tumour-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, although elucidating this process could provide the basis for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumours. Here we find that allogeneic tumour rejection is initiated in mice by naturally occurring tumour-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DCs) to internalize tumour antigens and subsequently activate tumour-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to treat autologous and autochthonous tumours successfully. Either systemic administration of DCs loaded with allogeneic-IgG-coated tumour cells or intratumoral injection of allogeneic IgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T-cell-mediated antitumour immune responses, resulting in tumour eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumours and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumours. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumour antigens after culture with allogeneic-IgG-loaded DCs, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumour-binding allogeneic IgG can induce powerful antitumour immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy.

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