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Dietary fish oil substitution alters the eicosanoid profile in ankle joints of mice during Lyme infection.

  • Author(s): Dumlao, Darren S;
  • Cunningham, Anna M;
  • Wax, Laura E;
  • Norris, Paul C;
  • Hanks, Jennifer Hughes;
  • Halpin, Rachel;
  • Lett, Kawasi M;
  • Blaho, Victoria A;
  • Mitchell, William J;
  • Fritsche, Kevin L;
  • Dennis, Edward A;
  • Brown, Charles R
  • et al.
Abstract

Dietary ingestion of (n-3) PUFA alters the production of eicosanoids and can suppress chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The extent of changes in eicosanoid production during an infection of mice fed a diet high in (n-3) PUFA, however, has not, to our knowledge, been reported. We fed mice a diet containing either 18% by weight soybean oil (SO) or a mixture with fish oil (FO), FO:SO (4:1 ratio), for 2 wk and then infected them with Borrelia burgdorferi. We used an MS-based lipidomics approach and quantified changes in eicosanoid production during Lyme arthritis development over 21 d. B. burgdorferi infection induced a robust production of prostanoids, mono-hydroxylated metabolites, and epoxide-containing metabolites, with 103 eicosanoids detected of the 139 monitored. In addition to temporal and compositional changes in the eicosanoid profile, dietary FO substitution increased the accumulation of 15-deoxy PGJ(2), an antiinflammatory metabolite derived from arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of the mono-hydroxylated metabolites revealed they were generated from primarily nonenzymatic mechanisms. Although dietary FO substitution reduced the production of inflammatory (n-6) fatty acid-derived eicosanoids, no change in the host inflammatory response or development of disease was detected.

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