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Protofibrillar intermediates of amyloid β-protein induce acute electrophysiological changes and progressive neurotoxicity in cortical neurons

  • Author(s): Hartley, DM
  • Walsh, DM
  • Ye, CP
  • Diehl, T
  • Vasquez, S
  • Vassilev, PM
  • Teplow, DB
  • Selkoe, DJ
  • et al.
Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is thought to be caused in part by the age-related accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The presence of neuritic plaques containing abundant Aβ-derived amyloid fibrils in AD brain tissue supports the concept that fibril accumulation per se underlies neuronal dysfunction in AD. Recent observations have begun to challenge this assumption by suggesting that earlier Aβ assemblies formed during the process of fibrilIogenesis may also play a role in AD pathogenesis. Here, we present the novel finding that protofibrils (PF), metastable intermediates in amyloid fibril formation, can alter the electrical activity of neurons and cause neuronal loss. Both low molecular weight Aβ (LMW Aβ) and PF reproducibly induced toxicity in mixed brain cultures in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. No increase in fibril formation during the course of the experiments was observed by either Congo red binding or electron microscopy, suggesting that the neurotoxicity of LMW Aβ and PF cannot be explained by conversion to fibrils. Importantly, protofibrils, but not LMW Aβ, produced a rapid increase in EPSPs, action potentials, and membrane depolarizations. These data suggest that PF have inherent biological activity similar to that of mature fibrils. Our results raise the possibility that the preclinical and early clinical progression of AD is driven in part by the accumulation of specific Aβ assembly intermediates formed during the process of fibrillogenesis.

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