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Educational interventions to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity among older Chinese Americans: A cluster-randomized trial

  • Author(s): Jih, J
  • Le, G
  • Woo, K
  • Tsoh, JY
  • Stewart, S
  • Gildengorin, G
  • Burke, A
  • Wong, C
  • Chan, E
  • Fung, LC
  • Yu, F
  • Pasick, R
  • McPhee, SJ
  • Nguyen, TT
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880259/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy of an in-language intervention of 2 lectures plus printed materials versus printed materials alone on knowledge and adherence to nutrition and physical activity guidelines among older Chinese Americans in San Francisco, California. Methods. From August 2010 to September 2013, we randomized 756 Chinese Americans aged 50 to 75 years to either lectures plus print (n = 361) or print (n = 357). Clusters were the participants recruited by each lay health worker. Intervention outcomes were changes in knowledge of recommended vegetable intake, fruit intake, and physical activity level and adherence to those recommendations from pre- to 6 months postintervention. Results. The retention rate was 99%. At baseline, knowledge and adherence to recommendations were low. Print yielded increases in knowledge of recommended vegetable intake and physical activity level and adherence to fruit intake and physical activity recommendations. Lectures plus print had significant increases in all 6 outcomes. In multivariable models, lectures plus print was superior to print for knowledge of vegetable (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 12.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.50, 24.45) and fruit (AOR = 16.16; 95% CI = 5.61, 46.51) intake recommendations and adherence to vegetable intake recommendations (AOR = 5.53; 95%CI = 1.96, 15.58). Conclusions. In-language print materials, alone and combined with lectures, increased nutrition and physical activity knowledge and behaviors among older Chinese Americans.

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