Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy
Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

  • Author(s): Holman, Hoi-Ying N.;
  • Martin, Michael C.;
  • McKinney, Wayne R.
  • et al.
Abstract

Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.

Main Content
For improved accessibility of PDF content, download the file to your device.
Current View