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Resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice lacking the CC chemokine receptor (CCR)2.

  • Author(s): Izikson, L
  • Klein, RS
  • Charo, IF
  • Weiner, HL
  • Luster, AD
  • et al.
Abstract

Monocyte recruitment to the central nervous system (CNS) is a necessary step in the development of pathologic inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of multiple sclerosis. Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, a potent agonist for directed monocyte migration, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of EAE. Here we report that deficiency in CC chemokine receptor (CCR)2, the receptor for MCP-1, confers resistance to EAE induced with a peptide derived from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55 (MOGp35-55). CCR2(-/)- mice immunized with MOGp35-55 failed to develop mononuclear cell inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS and failed to increase CNS levels of the chemokines RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), MCP-1, and interferon (IFN)-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) as well the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5. Additionally, T cells from CCR2(-/)- immunized mice showed decreased antigen-induced proliferation and production of IFN-gamma compared with wild-type immunized controls, suggesting that CCR2 enhances the T helper cell type 1 immune response in EAE. These data indicate that CCR2 plays a necessary and nonredundant role in the pathogenesis of EAE.

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