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Treatment Intensification in Patients With Kawasaki Disease and Coronary Aneurysm at Diagnosis.

  • Author(s): Dionne, Audrey
  • Burns, Jane C
  • Dahdah, Nagib
  • Tremoulet, Adriana H
  • Gauvreau, Kimberlee
  • de Ferranti, Sarah D
  • Baker, Annette L
  • Son, Mary Beth
  • Gould, Patrick
  • Fournier, Anne
  • Newburger, Jane W
  • Friedman, Kevin G
  • et al.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:Coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) are a serious complication of Kawasaki disease. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) within 10 days of fever onset reduces the risk of CAA from 25% to <5%. Corticosteroids and infliximab are often used in high-risk patients or those with CAA at diagnosis, but there are no data on their longer-term impact on CAA. METHODS:Retrospective multicenter study including children who had CAA with a z score ≥2.5 and <10 at time of diagnosis and who received primary therapy with IVIg alone or in combination with either corticosteroids or infliximab within 10 days of onset of fever. RESULTS:Of 121 children, with a median age of 2.8 (range 0.1-15.5) years, 30 (25%) received primary therapy with corticosteroids and IVIg, 58 (48%) received primary therapy with infliximab and IVIg, and 33 (27%) received primary therapy with IVIg only. Median coronary z scores at the time of diagnosis did not differ among treatment groups (P = .39). Primary treatment intensification with either corticosteroids or infliximab were independent protective factors against progression of coronary size on follow-up (coefficient: -1.31 [95% confidence interval: -2.33 to -0.29]; coefficient: -1.07 [95% confidence interval: -1.95 to -0.19], respectively). CONCLUSIONS:Among a high-risk group of patients with Kawasaki disease with CAA on baseline echocardiography, those treated with corticosteroids or infliximab in addition to IVIg had less progression in CAA size compared with those treated with IVIg alone. Prospective randomized trials are needed to determine the best adjunctive treatment of patients who present with CAA.

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