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Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis revealed by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of the striata in two mouse models of Parkinson's disease

  • Author(s): Chin, MH
  • Qian, WJ
  • Wang, H
  • Petyuk, VA
  • Bloom, JS
  • Sforza, DM
  • Laćan, G
  • Liu, D
  • Khan, AH
  • Cantor, RM
  • Bigelow, DJ
  • Melega, WP
  • Camp, DG
  • Smith, RD
  • Smith, DJ
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1021/pr070546lCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

The molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in the nigrostriatal pathway in Parkinson's disease (PD) are not completely understood. Here, we use mass spectrometry and microarrays to study the proteomic and transcriptomic changes in the striatum of two mouse models of PD, induced by the distinct neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (METH). Proteomic analyses resulted in the identification and relative quantification of 912 proteins with two or more unique peptides and 86 proteins with significant abundance changes following neurotoxin treatment. Similarly, microarray analyses revealed 181 genes with significant changes in mRNA, following neurotoxin treatment. The combined protein and gene list provides a clearer picture of the potential mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration observed in PD. Functional analysis of this combined list revealed a number of significant categories, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. These results constitute one of the largest descriptive data sets integrating protein and transcript changes for these neurotoxin models with many similar end point phenotypes but distinct mechanisms. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

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