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Open Access Publications from the University of California

The Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies was established to promote the study, understanding and solution of regional policy issues, with special reference to Southern California. Areas of study include problems of the environment, urban design, housing, community and neighborhood dynamics, transportation and local economic development. The Center was founded in 1988 with a $5 million endowment from Ralph and Goldy Lewis. In addition to income from the Lewis Endowment, the Center is supported by private and corporate foundation gifts and grants, individual donors, and research grants from a variety of governmental agencies. The Center sponsors a lecture/seminar series, as well as workshops and conferences focusing on Southern California, in an effort to build bridges to the local community.

Some working papers are not available electronically but a link is provided to the Lewis Center website for ordering instructions. (http://lewis.sppsr.ucla.edu/WorkingPapers.html)

Cover page of The Economic Development Potential of the Green Sector

The Economic Development Potential of the Green Sector

(2006)

This brief contains policy recommendations on establishing a regional economic development and job creation initiative to grow the Green sector into a significant export base. The long-term goals are to capture internal and external economies of scale, agglomeration benefits, and a cutting edge market identity to develop a region as a leader for meeting the growing demand for Green jobs and services. This effort requires a rounded and balanced economic ecology that includes strengthening and increasing the number of Green vendors, suppliers and related supply chains. This is a desirable goal because the Green market is projected to grow substantially both domestically and globally over the next decade.

Cover page of CalWORKs Sanction Patterns in Four Counties: A Technical Analysis

CalWORKs Sanction Patterns in Four Counties: A Technical Analysis

(2005)

This technical report is part of a study commissioned and funded by the Welfare Policy Research Project (WPRP, a program administered by the California Policy Research Center, University of California, Office of the President). Additional funds were provided by the Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA; UCLA’s School of Public Affairs; and the UC Office of the President. We are indebted to Paul Smilanick, Leslie Raderman, and Everett Haslett of the California Department of Social Services for their assistance in accessing state employment and earnings data, and to those with the welfare agencies in the four participating counties who facilitated access to and provided assistance with welfare administrative data for this project. We also thank the WPRP staff and numerous colleagues who provided valuable comments and suggestions, and Lucy Tran and Al Averbach for helping prepare this report. We alone are responsible for all interpretations and any errors.

Cover page of CalWORKS Sanction Policies in Four Counties: An Analysis for Administrative Data

CalWORKS Sanction Policies in Four Counties: An Analysis for Administrative Data

(2005)

California policymakers are seeking information on how counties are administering welfare sanctions- the procedures by which the state and county welfare agencies penalize low-income adults with children when they fail to comply with various CalWORKs program requirements. In this Briefing Paper, we list policymakers’ key questions and the aspects of each addressed by our study on CalWORKs sanctions in Alameda, Fresno, Kern, and San Diego counties.

Cover page of CalWORKs Sanction Policies in Four Counties: Practices, Attitudes, and Knowledge

CalWORKs Sanction Policies in Four Counties: Practices, Attitudes, and Knowledge

(2005)

The federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 was the most sweeping overhaul of the U.S. welfare program for poor families with children since its inception in the 1935 Social Security Act.To comply with the new federal law, California passed its Temporary Assistance to Needy Families plan in August 1997. Counties began implementing the new program, CalWORKs (California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids), on January 1, 1998.

Cover page of Socioeconomic Status of American Indian Adults in Los Angeles

Socioeconomic Status of American Indian Adults in Los Angeles

(2004)

This policy brief is part of a series on the socioeconomic status of American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIANs) in the Los Angeles metropolitan region, home to the largest urbanized AIAN population in the country. This brief presents findings on the factors that determine educational, employment, and housing outcomes for AIAN adults in the Los Angeles metropolitan area relative to outcomes for non-Hispanic whites (NHW). The analyses are based on individual-level data and econometric models to estimate the independent impacts of observable causal factors.

Cover page of The Status of American Indian Children in Los Angeles..

The Status of American Indian Children in Los Angeles..

(2003)

This policy brief presents findings on the status of American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN) children in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, which is coterminous with the County. According to the 2000 Census, there were an estimated 111,000 AIANs in the region who are indigenous to the greater United States. Over a quarter of these AIANs are under the age of 17. These children and their parents face numerous social problems and economic challenges, many of which have been previously documented. This brief uses three decades of census data to provide an updated analysis of the socioeconomic status of AIAN children, focusing on demographic characteristics, poverty, and educational issues.

Cover page of Sources of Insurance Coverage Among Children of Recent Welfare Recipients.

Sources of Insurance Coverage Among Children of Recent Welfare Recipients.

(2003)

This issue brief analyzes the coverage sources of children of recent welfare recipients in Los Angeles County and examines the relationship between parents and children’s sources of coverage by addressing three primary policy questions. 1) How does the source of coverage of parents who were recent welfare recipients affect the source of coverage for their children? 2) Do parents who are off welfare and no longer covered by Medi-Cal maintain public insurance coverage for their children? 3) How do combinations of coverage sources for recent welfare recipients and their children differ by recipient employment outcomes?

Cover page of Premium Assistance Programs for Recent Welfare Recipients.

Premium Assistance Programs for Recent Welfare Recipients.

(2003)

This issue brief discusses the possibility of a premium assistance program in California that targets recent welfare recipients by addressing three main policy questions. 1) Are welfare recipients a good target population for a premium assistance program? 2) Who would be eligible for premium assistance and where do they work? 3) What are the challenges of premium assistance programs in California?