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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Recent Work

The UC Berkeley School of Public Health is the first school of public health west of the Mississippi. The University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health was founded in 1943 on the Berkeley campus, where it had its origins almost two decades earlier with the creation of the Department of Hygiene in 1919. Find out more about our history. The UC Berkeley School of Public Health is one of 49 schools accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health.

Mission, Vision, and Values

Building on a campus tradition of pre-eminent interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary scholarship, education and public engagement that challenges conventional thinking, the UC Berkeley School of Public Health develops diverse leaders equipped to help solve the health challenges of the 21st century and beyond. Read more about the School's mission, vision, and core values.

UC Berkeley School of Public Health

Cover page of We will be the best at getting better! A playbook for population health improvement

We will be the best at getting better! A playbook for population health improvement

(2019)

For transforming organizations and communities, the San Francisco Department of Public Health, Population Health Division has embraced population health lean—a transdisciplinary management system for learning, adaptation, innovation, and continuous improvement based on the Toyota Production System (lean), collective impact and other methods. Our training focus is on lean thinking and practice. Our values include respect for people (humility, compassion, equity, and dignity) and continuous improvement (challenge, "go and see" to understand, kaizen, and teamwork).

Cover page of Population health thinking with Bayesian networks

Population health thinking with Bayesian networks

(2018)

public health, population health, decision analysis, causal inference, program theory, Bayesian networks, epidemiology, decision quality

Cover page of Syringe access, disposal and recovery to protect the public's health

Syringe access, disposal and recovery to protect the public's health

(2018)

Public health principles are based on promoting dignity, equity and compassion for all. San Francisco has made great strides towards "Getting to Zero" HIV infections, deaths, and stigma. However, we face new challenges with persons who inject drugs (PWID), and increases in substance use disorder, mental illness, and homelessness. Residents and visitors are concerned about (a) an increase in people injecting drugs in public and (b) an increase in discarded syringes on the streets of San Francisco. Some have asked whether syringe access programs are distributing too many syringes, and whether this poses a health risk to the general public. This brief reviews the science behind syringe access programs and how they protect the public’s health. To protect the public’s health, San Francisco’s deploys a collective impact approach to (a) reduce syringe sharing, infection, and disease prevalence (by syringe access); (b) reduce contact with discarded syringes (by syringe disposal and recovery); and (c) prevent and reduce needlestick injury harms (occupational safety and health).

Cover page of We will be the best at getting better! An introduction to population health lean

We will be the best at getting better! An introduction to population health lean

(2017)

For transforming organizations and community health, the San Francisco Department of Public Health, Population Health Division has embraced population health lean—an innovation and performance improvement management system based on the Toyota Production System (lean), collective impact methods (e.g., Results-Based AccountabilityTM), and human-centered design. We cover lean, collective impact, human-centered design, making quality decisions, building effective teams, and leading organization transformations. Our core values include humility, respect for people, teamwork, embracing challenges, genchi genbutsu (“go and see” to understand), and kaizen (continuous improvement).