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Open Access Publications from the University of California

UC Merced Library

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This series is automatically populated with publications deposited by UC Merced Library researchers in accordance with the University of California’s open access policies. For more information see Open Access Policy Deposits and the UC Publication Management System.

Cover page of Statement on Inclusion and Equity in Special Collections, Archives, and Distinctive Collections in the University of California Libraries

Statement on Inclusion and Equity in Special Collections, Archives, and Distinctive Collections in the University of California Libraries

(2021)

We acknowledge historical absences in library collections, including those of the University of California Libraries. We will develop practices that counteract a paradigm of racist, sexist, and white-centered collecting, description, instruction, and access. Metadata, digital exhibits, and archival descriptions in particular have disadvantaged communities of color, limited points of subject-based access, and contributed to a culture of exclusivity and inequity. We commit to immediate and enduring work to elevate the narratives, perspectives, and expertise of the marginalized: those who identify as Black, Indigenous, persons of color, immigrants, women, disabled people, and those from the LGBTQ+ communities. We recognize that this work is iterative and ongoing, inherently risky, and messy, but entirely necessary.

Apprenticing Researchers: Exploring Upper-Division Students' Information Literacy Competencies

(2020)

This study explores upper-division students' research competencies, dispositions, challenges, and developments through focus group interviews complemented by surveys, including local responses to the Experiences with Information Literacy topical module from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). These undergraduates, apprenticing as researchers, use research practices that are more novice than expert, as described in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. They employ a range of abilities in the research process and demonstrate an emerging knowledge of the information environment and of academic disciplines. Because curriculum strongly influences information literacy development, librarians should pursue close collaborations with faculty.

Cover page of Forum Planning Committee’s Report to UC Council of University Librarians on Choosing Pathways to Open Access (CP2OA)

Forum Planning Committee’s Report to UC Council of University Librarians on Choosing Pathways to Open Access (CP2OA)

(2019)

On October 16-17, 2018, University of California (UC) libraries hosted a working forum in Berkeley, California entitled “Choosing Pathways to Open Access” (“CP2OA”) (see https://cp2oa18.com/). Sponsored by the University of California’s Council of University Librarians (“CoUL”), the forum was designed to enable North American library or consortium leaders and key academic stakeholders to engage in action-focused deliberations about redirecting subscription and other funds toward sustainable open access (“OA”) publishing.

This report was prepared by members of the forum’s Planning Committee1 as a way to update CoUL on forum outcomes, and to synthesize these outcomes into recommendations for further collective (UC multi-institutional) action to advance OA. The recommendations reflect the opinions of the report drafters; they are not an official statement by CoUL, nor should publication of this report signify CoUL’s endorsement of our recommendations. We (the Planning Committee) instead hope that CoUL will consider the recommendations in due course, particularly as some of them reflect efforts already underway within various UC libraries.

The Fake News Phenomenon--An Opportunity for the Library Community to Make a Splash?

(2019)

When media coverage of the fake news phenomenon blew up in the waning months of 2016, many were taken by surprise. I suspect, however, that most librarians had thoughts similar to mine: “Wait a minute! This is about information literacy. I’ve been rolling that rock up the hill my entire career.” While the idea of individuals forming opinions and making decisions on the basis of misinformation is discouraging, the furor over fake news represents an opportunity for the library community to show some leadership and, as difficult as the challenge may be, take meaningful action to help people become more savvy users of information. Before considering what actions the library community might take, though, it is important to understand the nuances of the problem.

The Challenge Facing Libraries in an Era of Fake News

(2017)

Making sense of information is hard, maybe increasingly so in today’s world. So what role have academic libraries played in helping people make sense of world bursting at the seams with information?

Cover page of The Use of Academic Libraries in the Digital Age: What the Numbers Say

The Use of Academic Libraries in the Digital Age: What the Numbers Say

(2017)

Given the early twenty-first century’s wealth of information, it is a fair question to ask: “Are we approaching a time when academic libraries will no longer be necessary?” According to academic library usage data, the answer to this question is clearly “No.” While over the last ten to twenty years the number of books borrowed from U.S. academic libraries has plummeted, the number of people setting foot in those same libraries has significantly increased. And although longitudinal data for the use of non-U.S. libraries is hard to come by, a small sampling of academic libraries outside of the U.S. reflects a similar trend of fewer books borrowed coupled with more visits. The paper concludes by suggestions reasons for why students are making increased use of academic library spaces in the Digital Age. 

Academic Libraries in the Digital Age

(2017)

academic libraries, library use, library space