Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Mild test anxiety influences neurocognitive performance among African Americans and European Americans: Identifying interfering and facilitating sources

  • Author(s): Thames, AD
  • Panos, SE
  • Arentoft, A
  • Byrd, DA
  • Hinkin, CH
  • Arbid, N
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/cdp/21/1/105/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2014 American Psychological Association. The current study examined ethnic/racial differences in test-related anxiety and its relationship to neurocognitive performance in a community sample of African American (n = 40) and European American (n = 36) adults. The authors hypothesized the following: (a) Test-anxiety related to negative performance evaluation would be associated with lower neurocognitive performance, whereas anxiety unrelated to negative evaluation would be associated with higher neurocognitive performance. (b) African American participants would report higher levels of anxiety about negative performance evaluation than European Americans. (c) European Americans would report higher levels of anxiety unrelated to negative performance evaluation. The first two hypotheses were supported: Ethnic/racial differences in test-taking anxiety emerged such that African Americans reported significantly higher levels of negative performance evaluation, which was associated with lower cognitive performance. The third hypothesis was not supported: African Americans and European Americans reported similar levels of test-anxiety unrelated to negative evaluation.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Item not freely available? Link broken?
Report a problem accessing this item