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Genomic and human papillomavirus profiling of an oral cancer cohort identifies TP53 as a predictor of overall survival.

  • Author(s): Mundi, Neil
  • Prokopec, Stephenie D
  • Ghasemi, Farhad
  • Warner, Andrew
  • Patel, Krupal
  • MacNeil, Danielle
  • Howlett, Christopher
  • Stecho, William
  • Plantinga, Paul
  • Pinto, Nicole
  • Ruicci, Kara M
  • Khan, Mohammed Imran
  • Han, Myung Woul
  • Yoo, John
  • Fung, Kevin
  • Sahovaler, Axel
  • Palma, David A
  • Winquist, Eric
  • Mymryk, Joe S
  • Barrett, John W
  • Boutros, Paul C
  • Nichols, Anthony C
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6894507/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Background:The genomic landscape of head and neck cancer has been reported through The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We attempt to determine if high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) or frequently mutated genes are correlated with survival in an oral cancer cohort. Methods:Patient demographic data along with data from final pathology was collected. Tumor DNA was analyzed using a custom Illumina targeted sequencing panel. Five high-risk HPV types were tested by qPCR. Statistical analyses were used to identify associations between patient outcome and mutational status. Results:High-risk HPV types were identified in 7% of cases; HPV status was not associated with survival. Mutations were identified in TP53, TERT promoter, & PIK3CA. Mutations in TP53 were significantly associated with poorer overall survival on multi-variate analysis (p = 0.03). Conclusions:Mutations in TP53 were associated with poor patient survival. Expanding our sample size may identify further predictors of outcome to direct customized cancer care.

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