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Open Access Publications from the University of California

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The UCLA Library Resource Forum provides an opportunity for library colleagues to learn about the innovative work and original research being conducted in the UCLA Library. The inaugural event was held on 23 March 2021 with a second event the following year on 22 March 2022. Please access the programs from each year for a full listing of presentations:

- 2021 Library Research Forum Program

- 2022 Library Research Forum Program

Welcome to Leganto

(2022)

Leganto allows course instructors to create lists and collections of materials and monitor student use in the new campus learning management system, Bruin Learn. Materials added to lists in Leganto can include articles, books, videos and other media, and can consist of Library resources, other online materials, items for purchase from the campus bookstore, original work by faculty, and more. Michelle will demonstrate how course instructors can get started with Leganto and discuss how Library staff can support its adoption and use.

  • 1 supplemental video

Audiovisual Preservation and Access (During a Pandemic)

(2022)

Implementing a secure streaming server for audiovisual materials at UCLA is an outgrowth of an ad hoc A/V Preservation Task Force started in 2016. The taskforce included Yasmin Dessem, Allie Whalen, Callie Holmes, Matthew Vest and a representative from the Ethnomusicology Archive. Yasmin Dessem will share the stakes of preserving audiovisual materials and the high risk of loss. Christopher Brennan and Matthew Vest will share efforts to implement a secure streaming server, Avalon. Primarily during remote work, the UCLA Music Library digitized over 2,500 audiovisual recordings from the Music Library and other UCLA Library units and made them available online via Avalon. Avalon has received over 37,000 media views since September 2020, allowing significantly greater access to streaming media collections than previously possible at UCLA. The presenters will give a tour of Avalon and share technical aspects, integration with existing services and programs, advocational efforts, and future plans, including integration of A/V reserves.

  • 1 supplemental video

Welcome & Opening Remarks

(2022)

University Librarian Ginny Steel welcomes attendees to the second annual Library Research Forum and provides brief opening remarks. 

  • 1 supplemental video

A 3-Unit Canvas Course Template for Integrating Digital Collections in the Curriculum

(2022)

Presenter from the UCLA Library Digital Library Program (DLP) will share examples from his collaboration with a faculty member in a pilot to increase and deepen student engagement with holdings from the UCLA Library’s Digital Collections in curricular contexts, leveraging the concurrent adoption by the University of the new learning management system (LMS), Canvas/BruinLearn. Digital collections overseen by the DLP are presented predominantly in the IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework), which enables reliable vertical integration of linked media content flows for students’ accessing, viewing, processing, and presenting high quality resources sustainably without file downloads, or uploads. Collaborating with administrators and staff from technical and instructional support units outside of the library, particularly the Canvas Transformation instructional design team, the DLP has designed, developed, and piloted a 3-unit modular template in the LMS to facilitate the use of digital collections to support undergraduate course curricula. The three units in the template direct students through three learning phases in their course, related to materials, methods, and products, respectively. This structure ensures adequate instructional attention to critical and proficiency-based learning goals, including information literacy, comparative analysis and annotation, and multimedia composition for public audiences. Pre-built modular units with integrated IIIF tools and learning activities are adapted in consultation with faculty to fit with course content, and presented in online and hybrid “flipped” instruction, making introductory through advanced digital project work scalable and manageable without necessitating substantial commitment of in-class instructional time.

  • 1 supplemental video

Building and Using a Collection: Personal Narratives of the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic—Lessons Learned and Next Steps

(2022)

UCLA Library Special Collections’ “Collection of Personal Narratives, Manuscripts, and Ephemera about the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic” (Manuscript Collection no. 509, or Biomed.0509) was built from scratch beginning a decade before the pandemic’s centenary. In years BCE (Before COVID Era), the collection was used by researchers and classes. During the COVID-19 Era, we shared content with newspapers and developed a public lecture for audiences ranging from UCLA’s Powell Society to the New York Academy of Medicine. This talk will profile the collection’s development, share lessons learned from its use, and consider and seek suggestions on next steps in exhibition, digitization, and curriculum integration.

  • 1 supplemental video

Understanding Misinformation: A Lesson Plan Toolkit Demonstration

(2022)

The Misinformation Toolkit, built collaboratively by a team of librarians and library student staff, gives anyone interested in designing a lesson on misinformation the tools to do so. The core principles of the toolkit are that misinformation is a systemic issue and the best way to combat it is through a collaborative learning environment that gives participants many opportunities to reflect, share, and explore together. This session will present some background on the creation of the toolkit and then demonstrate using the toolkit. After this presentation we hope that participants will feel empowered to use the toolkit to build their own lesson on misinformation!

  • 1 supplemental video

Reading Format Attitudes in the Time of COVID

(2022)

Preliminary findings from a new study of UCLA students' reading format attitudes during the COVID-19 pandemic will be presented. A study of UCLA's study of students' remote learning attitudes in spring 2020 did not include one question related to reading electronically or the library, and this study fills that gap to reveal that most students’ attitudes towards reading in e-format did not improve during COVID. It is possible that the increased amount of time spent on their computers during remote learning in general caused a screen fatigue that lowered their ability and desire to read their course readings online.

  • 1 supplemental video

Filling in the History of the Blank Book

(2022)

Books bound to be written in by their owners have their own history, and believe it or not, many patents filed in the US patent office. Take a look at the material culture of bound structures in a whole new way.

  • 1 supplemental video