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Open Access Publications from the University of California

About Us

Technology Innovations in Statistics Education (TISE) was founded in 2007 to address the growing need for peer-reviewed discussions concerning the interactions between technology and statistics education. Since then, there has been a growing realization across many sectors concerning the urgent need to prepare students at all levels to think about and reason with data. And there is a growing recognition that to work with data requires developing a synthesis of statistical and computational thinking in order to access and wrangle data. We now see data science courses in a growing number of high schools, and consortiums and conferences on developing data literacy and data acumen. The mission of TISE is to provide a forum for researchers to discuss ways in which technology can enhance data acumen, and ways in which students can be taught to use and develop technology to better reason with data.

TISE seeks scholarly papers that address any of these themes:

  • Designing technology to improve statistics and data science education
  • Using technology to develop understanding of fundamental concepts of statistics and data science
  • Teaching technology to develop insight into and access to data

TISE is published on a rolling schedule, with a new issue released each calendar year and papers published throughout the year. Papers can fall into one of four categories.

TISE is published on a rolling schedule, with a new issue released each calendar year and papers published throughout the year. Papers can fall into one of four categories:

  1. Statistical Investigations: Research papers that report on empirical studies or develop theoretical context for teaching with or about technology.
  2. Statistical Thinking: Position papers that describe a timely issue and propose a solution
  3. Technology Innovations: These papers describe new technologies and their design or describe innovative uses of previous technologies
  4. Notes: The Notes sections allows for detailed Letters to the Editor, descriptions of class lessions or activities, or other less formal submissions.

More detail regarding each of these is provided in the Aims and Scope.