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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Research works and presentations included here have been selected by the LAUC Research and Professional Development Committee of the UC San Diego Library.

Cover page of Unlocking the Value of the Monograph: 6400 Book Pairs Speak

Unlocking the Value of the Monograph: 6400 Book Pairs Speak

(2020)

Delivered as part of the session "Unlocking the Value of the Monograph" at Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER&L) 15th Annual Conference, Austin, Texas, March 9, 2020.

Scholarly monographs are undergoing a digital transformation that brings new value to both libraries and researchers. This presentation approaches the session theme with a single institution’s view of the digital environment unlocking the value of the scholarly monograph. It builds upon and expands a preliminary appreciation from ER&L 2019 that compared local download activity across ebooks recently acquired via two evidence-based programs at UC San Diego with the lifetime circulation histories of our matching legacy print holdings. This new foray is powered by a 10 times larger study pool of every JSTOR Books title purchased since the inception of our local contract in early 2015, which now includes DDA, EBA, and Pick-and-Mix channels.

Slides 8 & 9 were not presented at ER&L 2020 owing to session time constraints. All script notes and slide transitions are preserved in the supplemental file.

  • 1 supplemental file
Cover page of Tell Us How UC It: Thinking Critically through a Living Archive for Student Activism

Tell Us How UC It: Thinking Critically through a Living Archive for Student Activism

(2019)

As questions, conversations, and debates surrounding social justice come to the surface on college campuses around the country, what role do libraries play? This presentation discusses a project called “Tell Us How UC It: A Living Archive” which took root in the sentiments of students on the University of California, San Diego campus.At the heart of the project was the belief that libraries, in their capacity as providers of information, can present a narrative in the hopes of informing their community, starting conversations, and inspiring student action. The concept of a living archive and other details of the project is covered, along with other critical perspectives and techniques such as tactical urbanism as a way to document and archive student voices. 

Cover page of Gone Digital

Gone Digital

(2019)

This talk given at the National Museum and Art Gallery of Papua New Guinea in Port Moresby covers some general best practices in the digitization process, as well as the management of born-digital materials. It provides an overview of digital projects at the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology at the University of California, San Diego and a brief demonstration of the UC San Diego Library’s Digital Collections website (library.ucsd.edu/dc), where many digitized materials from the Tuzin Archive are accessible. Specifically, it uses the digitization of the Papua New Guinea Patrol Reports as a case study.

Founded in 1982 as the Melanesian Archive and renamed in 2012, the Tuzin Archive for Melanesian Anthropology has evolved into a major repository for research materials created by anthropologists and other scholars working in Melanesia.

Cover page of Singsings and Storytelling: Digitizing Audio Recordings

Singsings and Storytelling: Digitizing Audio Recordings

(2019)

Communities assembling for singsing celebrations, ethnographic interviews conversing on grammar and vocabularies, elders discussing daily affairs - these are just a few snippets of at-risk sound recordings held at the Archives comprised primarily of the personal papers of anthropologists, documenting research on the cultures of Melanesia. The recordings will be digitized over the coming year due to a recent grant received. The nearly 800 reel-to-reel and cassette tape field recordings from seven collections include rare interviews, songs, performances, linguistic material, and oral histories collected in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands from the mid-to-late 20th century.

This presentation provides an overview of the project, including the details of the language and the type of recordings in each collection. It also engages in a discussion on partnerships and models for sharing the recordings once digitized and explores ways to build and strengthen collaborations made possible in the digital era.

Cover page of Identifying Electronic Cataloging in Publication (ECIP) Partner Needs: Survey Results on ECIP Set up

Identifying Electronic Cataloging in Publication (ECIP) Partner Needs: Survey Results on ECIP Set up

(2019)

This is a poster about ECIP partners’ ECIP set up experience. It was presented at the Poster session on June 23, 2018 at the American Library Association annual conference in New Orleans, June 23, 2018.

The Electronic Cataloging in Publication (ECIP) Cataloging Partnership Program began in 2004. It is a collaboration between the Library of Congress (LC) Cataloging in Publication (CIP) Program, publishers, and libraries across the United States.  System set up for the program proved challenging for library partners. A survey was conducted during February 8-March 6, 2018 to learn about ECIP partners’ ECIP set up experience. The findings show that communication and training documentation are two key elements for program to be effective and successful. The survey result helped LC CIP program develop new and improved ECIP system.

EdTech: Ensuring the "Ed" Comes Before "Tech" Through Online Tutorial Assessment and Evaluation

(2019)

The tutorial environment presents specific limitations with regards to assessment and evaluation. Designers of online information literacy tutorials often will never meet their learners. They may be students who have been assigned a tutorial but who never actually speak to a librarian or they may be self-guided learners who are accessing self-help tutorials in order to learn how to do a task. The removal of an instructor presence creates limitations for formative and summative assessment. Using the experience of instructional design librarians who have created and evaluated over twenty online tutorials, taken by over 10,000 students, you will learn how to assess learning that occurs asynchronously online when learning analytics is not available and changes in student behavior as a result of learning is unobservable. 

Presented at ALA Annual 2019

Handout link bit.ly/EdBeforeTech

  • 1 supplemental PDF
Cover page of Transcribing Oral Histories for Race and Oral History, Spring 19

Transcribing Oral Histories for Race and Oral History, Spring 19

(2019)

Librarians Alanna Aiko Moore and Cristela Garcia-Spitz participated in the Race and Oral History class by teaching a workshop on the transcription process.  More information on the UCSD Race and Oral History Project is available at https://knit.ucsd.edu/rohp/

Cover page of Tell Us How UC It: Social Impact through Digital Initiative Projects

Tell Us How UC It: Social Impact through Digital Initiative Projects

(2019)

Panel presentation at the University of San Diego 2019 Digital Initiatives Symposium called "Having a Social Impact: Supporting Social Justice and Open Access through Digital Initiative Projects."  Digital infrastructures and tools allow organizations and institutions to create opportunities for projects, information transfer, learning, and platforms for a range of voices. It also creates opportunities that promote open access, social justice, and social impact. Panelists who are directly involved in digital initiative projects that specifically seek to impact society, either by opening up information resources to everyone, or by giving people the digital resources they need to be self-supportive, will talk about their projects and the beliefs that underpin their efforts. From libraries, to online content providers, to digital skills educators, the panel represents a wide range of organizations that are employing digital initiatives for social good. Organizations participating in this panel discussion include the Catholic Research Resources Alliance, Digital Divide Data, the Center for Bibliographical and Research Studies, UC-Riverside, and the UC San Diego Library.

Cover page of DLF Project Managers Group - Project Portfolio Management Demo

DLF Project Managers Group - Project Portfolio Management Demo

(2019)

This new series of demos are hosted by the Digital Library Federation Project Managers Group as a skill-sharing and virtual learning experience. The first of the series was presented by Cristela Garcia-Spitz, Digital Initiatives Librarian at the UC San Diego Library on Friday, April 5th at 2pm EST (11am PST). Cristela discussed project portfolio management and shared a demo of how digital projects are being tracked by the UC San Diego Library's Digital Library Development Program using Confluence and JIRA. She also covered some of the goals and challenges of portfolio management. The presentation recording is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtLLmFWQeQ8

Cover page of Inclusive Places in Online Spaces: Creating Inclusive Online Library Tutorials

Inclusive Places in Online Spaces: Creating Inclusive Online Library Tutorials

(2019)

When fostering diversity, equity, and inclusion in online spaces, accessibility is the framework by which tutorial developers work. However, missing from this frame and the associated literature is how to create inclusive tutorials that are reflective of diverse student populations. Participants will learn how we are moving beyond accessibility for equitable access to create tutorials that are not only accessible but also reflective of our diverse student population. Our solutions are grounded in teaching and instructional design practices for diverse populations. We will also discuss how we are evaluating our efforts by working with student groups to incorporate their viewpoints.