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River-Lab

UC Berkeley

Graduate student research papers

About Graduate student research papers: TODO
Cover page of Flood Risk Management and the Levee Effect in West Sacramento, California

Flood Risk Management and the Levee Effect in West Sacramento, California

(2021)

This paper examines flood risk management and floodplain development in WestSacramento, a flood prone California city adjacent to the state capital. While Sest Sacramentoparticipates in the National Flood Insurance Program, the Flood Insurance Rate Map for the cityis outdated and does not adequately reflect actual flood risk. Analyses of US Census data,National Flood Insurance Program products, zoning ordinances, and remote sensing dataindicate that development has continued in areas exposed to high flood hazard, increasing the risk of life and property to flooding.

Cover page of Post-Occupancy Evaluation Affected by Seasons: A Case Study of Waterfront Green Belt Along Yitong River in Changchun City

Post-Occupancy Evaluation Affected by Seasons: A Case Study of Waterfront Green Belt Along Yitong River in Changchun City

(2021)

The vitality and user experience of outdoor public places in high latitudes often change drastically with the change of seasons. This survey carried out Post-Occupancy Evaluation for different seasons on the green belt along the Yitong River in Changchun City since the current one is for summer. Through a field and online survey, documented the special behavior of users in winter, the influence of the season on users of different ages, living distances, and limitations of the current infrastructure. Finally, the analysis drew the following conclusions, the season will affect the travel frequency of residents, especially those who live far away and relatively young. Seasons will also affect residents' evaluation of riverside infrastructure. There is a lack of pedestrian bridges. At present, there are more users in the southern section of Changchun on the Yitong River than in the northern sectio

Cover page of Water Pollution Resulting from Homeless Encampments in Creeks: Programs in Sacramento, Santa Cruz, and San Pablo

Water Pollution Resulting from Homeless Encampments in Creeks: Programs in Sacramento, Santa Cruz, and San Pablo

(2021)

The purpose of this research is to provide a holistic snapshot of how different Sacramento, Santa Cruz, and San Pablo monitoring and mitigating water quality issues posed by tent encampments in waterways. For Sacramento, a look into the “Mile Stewards” Program illustrates one effective effort for removing debris from the American River Parkway. In Santa Cruz, the Downtown Streets Team incorporates people experiencing homelessness into their organizational model, which provides the people a sense of purpose and helps keep the banks of the San Lorenzo River clean. In San Pablo, there are ongoing trash removal efforts at both a city level through volunteer and city employee support and at a county level through CORE Creeks. All three cities are on the path to incorporating necessary social programs with environmental protection to work with people experiencing homelessness and tackle water quality issues resulting from tent encampments in the riparian corridor.

Cover page of Tracing the Alhambra Wash: Past, Present, and Future

Tracing the Alhambra Wash: Past, Present, and Future

(2021)

Large-scale channelization of Los Angeles water courses in the 20th century led to the invisibility of waterin today’s highly urban, infrastructural landscape. Though channels were built to protect the populationfrom flood risks, they do not provide a long-term solution for flood control, and they disconnect thepopulation from their landscape and local ecology. Revealing local waterways to the public in thoughtfulways may reconnect people to the land’s ecological history and inform future land use decisions for amore resilient future. With this goal in mind, I frame this paper within the context of a lesser-knowntributary in the San Gabriel Valley region of Los Angeles County: the Alhambra Wash. I trace the history, existing conditions, and potential interventions for the wash with the aim of building stronger cognitiveconnections between the local community and their waterway.

Cover page of Tassajara Creek, Twenty Years Later: Long-term riparian vegetation restoration monitoring using field surveys and remote sensing

Tassajara Creek, Twenty Years Later: Long-term riparian vegetation restoration monitoring using field surveys and remote sensing

(2021)

Actively incising Lower Tassajara Creek in Dublin, California, was restored as acompound channel in 1999-2000 to mitigate incision and provide flood conveyancecapacity to reduce flood risk to an adjacent greenfield residential development. Thecompound channel design incorporated wide floodplain terraces, planted with nativeriparian and upland vegetation. Prior geomorphological and ecological studies conductedin the first decade after the restoration project suggested that the project hadsuccessfully halted channel incision and that riparian vegetation was developing. I builtupon the last vegetation study in 2008, recreating the photo monitoring points andresurveying the established vegetation transects for the Tassajara Creek project’snorthern reach. I also used remote sensing to quantify changes in vegetation cover overthe last decade, finding a 63% increase in vegetation cover. Both field and remote sensinganalyses indicated continued tree canopy growth and maturation of the riparianecosystem in this restored urban stream.