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Open Access Publications from the University of California
Cover page of BugFlipper: A freeware plug-in for human assisted image processing in the GIMP

BugFlipper: A freeware plug-in for human assisted image processing in the GIMP

(2019)

Bugflipper is an open source plugin for the GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) that performs a series of standard image correction tasks that are common when digitizing natural history collection specimens. These tasks include rotating images, color and contrast correction, reduction in overall file size, cropping, and renaming the image with a barcode number as the filename.

BugFlipper automates many of the processes based on preset values, but the program also includes a human assisted step that allows custom processing of non-standard images, quality control, and image renaming during the process. A comprehensive instruction manual for BugFlipper is included here, with troubleshooting tips and advice for modifying the plugin code to simplify a variety of human-assisted image-processing problems.

Cover page of Local grassland restoration affects insect communities

Local grassland restoration affects insect communities

(2019)

It is hypothesised that ecological restoration in grasslands can induce an alternative stable state shift in vegetation. The change in vegetation influences insect community assemblages and allows for greater functional redundancy in pollination and refuge for native insect species. 2. Insect community assemblages at eight coastal California grassland sites were evaluated. Half of these sites had undergone restoration through active revegetation of native grassland flora and half were non-restored. Insects were collected from Lupinus bicolor (Fabaceae) within 2 × 2-m2 plots in spring 2017. Lupinus bicolor is a common native species that is used in California restoration projects, and home and state landscaping projects. 3. Ordination demonstrated that insect community assemblages were different between restored and non-restored sites. These differences were seen in insect functional groups as well as taxa-specific differences and were found to be driven by environmental characteristics such as non-native forb cover. 4. Functional redundancy of herbivores decreased at restored sites, while pollinators became more redundant compared with non-restored sites. The assemblages of the common species found at restoration sites contained more native insects than those found at non-restored sites, including species such as Bombus vosnesenskii. 5. Local grassland restoration has the potential to induce an alternative stable state change and affect insect community assemblages. Additionally, it was found that grassland restoration can be a potential conservation tool to provide refugia for bumblebees (Bombus), but additional studies are required to fully understand its broader applicability.

Cover page of Seed Bulking of <em>Lupinus Nipomensis</em> 2016

Seed Bulking of Lupinus Nipomensis 2016

(2019)

In this collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, CCBER conducts a seed-bulking project to determine if Lupinus nipomensis can be bulked in a greenhouse setting. Testing was also conducted to determine the environmental conditions that best support this endangered species. 

Cover page of <em>Lupinus nipomensis</em> First Season Seed Bulking Report, 2012 – 2013

Lupinus nipomensis First Season Seed Bulking Report, 2012 – 2013

(2019)

This report describes the methods and results from the first season (2012 – 2013) of Lupinus nipomensis seed bulking at the CCBER Greenhouse and Nursery facility.

Cover page of An Update on the Invertebrate Zoology Collection at the University of California, Santa Barbara 

An Update on the Invertebrate Zoology Collection at the University of California, Santa Barbara 

(2018)

We are in the second year of a project to revitalize entomology at the University of California, Santa Barbara and have new updates of its impact on the campus to report. The UC Santa Barbara Natural History Collection (UCSB) at the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration formed the UCSB Invertebrate Zoology collection from about 10K historical specimens that were found in a basement on the UCSB campus. The collection has continued to grow rapidly through Coastal California arthropod survey efforts, donated student collections, and faculty research projects. New results from the project include the formation of an outreach program through the UCSB Extension Department and discovery of several extirpated rare or endangered insects that once occurred on the UCSB campus. We will report on how the discovery of extirpated species on campus has received some press and the development of a collection on campus has raised the profile of entomology and insect conservation in the area.

This poster was presented at the 2018 Entomological Collections Network meeting held in Vancouver, Canada on November 10-11. 

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Cover page of The effect of common soil amendments on the germination and growth of native plants frequently used in restoration in coastal southern California

The effect of common soil amendments on the germination and growth of native plants frequently used in restoration in coastal southern California

(2018)

A common practice in habitat restoration is to amend soil to help promote the growth and establishment of native plants. However, there is often little research done to determine the germinate rate of native species in field soil and how those germination rates are affected by soil amendment. This is particularly important to understand when direct seeding is being planned for a restoration site and to understand how plants will establish in an area after restoration has concluded. In 2017, restoration began on the site of an old golf course near the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB). Surveys of the former golf course have shown that the soil quality is generally poor, with low levels of nutrients and high salinity. Consequently, the restoration plan will incorporate the addition of amendments to the soil to help with the establishment of native plants. To better understand how the soil amendments will impact the germination rate of native plants that are being targeted for restoration, a greenhouse experiment was undertaken on seven locally sourced plants that are native to the coastal Santa Barbara region. Species were grown in soil collected from the former Ocean Meadows Golf Course at the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) native plant greenhouse and nursery. Seeds were planted in four different potential soil amendments (biochar, gypsum, mulch, and untreated), and their germination and growth measured in early 2017. Six of the seven species germinated in all soil treatments, except for one shrub, which did not germinate in any soil treatment. Growth rates were similar across species, with greater growth rates observed in the greenhouse potting soil for all species. Soil pH and salinity did not have a significant effect on the germination or growth rate of any species. Future studies should look at soil structure, the concentration of nitrogen and other nutrients, and other soil characteristics to determine why some soil amendments promoted plant growth and establishment more than others for native plants. This experiment was undertaken by UCSB undergraduate research interns Anne-Marie Parkinson and Danielle Gantar, who were sponsored by the UCSB Associated Students Coastal Fund.

Cover page of From rejection to collection! A new entomology collection at the University of California, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History takes the university by swarm.

From rejection to collection! A new entomology collection at the University of California, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History takes the university by swarm.

(2017)

The Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) has formed an insect collection from 10,000 historical specimens that were rediscovered in a basement on the UCSB campus and a little funding. Since its discovery, the UCSB collection has grown rapidly through Coastal California arthropod survey efforts, donated student collections, and faculty research projects. These surveys, conducted by the Cheadle Center for conservation and restoration monitoring, are hugely valuable as the coastal regions of Santa Barbara and Ventura County are critically endangered habitats, with over 95% of these areas lost to human disturbance.

Cover page of Water Quality of North Campus Open Space &amp; Devereux Slough: Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

Water Quality of North Campus Open Space & Devereux Slough: Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

(2016)

This report summarizes data collected between November 2015 through April 2016 for assessing indicators of water quality for aquatic biodiversity in Devereux Slough and tributaries in the UCSB North Campus Open Space.

Cover page of Outplanting Field Experiment for <em>Lupinus nipomensis</em> at Black Lake Ecological Area

Outplanting Field Experiment for Lupinus nipomensis at Black Lake Ecological Area

(2016)

This paper describes a study on the translocation and reestablishment of the federally endangered species Lupinus nipomensis (Fabaceae) and aims to better understand the effect of various biotic and abiotic conditions on plant growth. 

Cover page of Campus Lagoon Water Quality Assessment 2016

Campus Lagoon Water Quality Assessment 2016

(2016)

This report assesses the water quality of UCSB's Campus Lagoon using multiple parameters and its ability to support aquatic life. In July 2011, the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) completed an assessment report on the water quality of the Campus Lagoon based on data collected from various surveys conducted over a five-year period (2006 – 2011). Here we present an update to the 2011 report with new data obtained from a recent (Dec. 2015 – Feb. 2016) survey of the quality of storm water run-off in the lagoon watershed and inclusion of data from a data sonde installed between 2009 and 2011.