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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Recent Work

The Center for Southeast Asia Studies (CSEAS) is an Organized Research Unit on the Berkeley Campus of the University of California. It promotes the expansion of Southeast Asian studies on the Berkeley campus, assists students with fellowship awards, facilitates faculty research, and supports expanded course offerings and development of new faculty positions. The Center for Southeast Asia Studies was established in l959. In 2000, it joined with the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at University of California, Los Angeles to form a consortium to become a new U.S Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center.

Cover page of UC Berkeley-UCLA Joint Conference on Southeast Asia ABSTRACTS

UC Berkeley-UCLA Joint Conference on Southeast Asia ABSTRACTS

(2010)

Spatial relations in Southeast Asia have long underpinned, stimulated and framed key works on political organization in the region. This conference set out to re-examine past formulations, while exploring new research and new understandings about space, landscape and human impact in Southeast Asia. The conference was organized by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UCLA, who form a consortium Title VI National Resource Center for Southeast Asian Studies

Cover page of “Can We Get Hak Ulayat?”: Land and Community in Pasir and Nunukan, East Kalimantan

“Can We Get Hak Ulayat?”: Land and Community in Pasir and Nunukan, East Kalimantan

(2008)

This paper is a case study into the effects of hak ulayat (indigenous land rights) claims on policies in the local districts of Nunukan and Pasir, East Kalimantan, after the collapse of the New Order regime in Indonesia in 1998. Nunukan has recognised hak ulayat, while Pasir intended to do so but abandoned this plan after popular protest. Whereas Indonesian law has undertaken considerable steps to define hak ulayat, studying district government considerations of ulayat claims through a strictly legal approach is too narrow to be of much actual use. The influence of local conceptions of hak ulayat and the stance of local authorities on the subject can be better understood through the inclusion of social, political and power relations which bring other interests to the fore. Such an analysis shows that not only is the law not the only authority in regulating hak ulayat, it is also caught in an inconvenient split between aspirations to nationwide applicability and the demands of local diversity.

Cover page of Village Government in Aceh, Three Years after the Tsunami

Village Government in Aceh, Three Years after the Tsunami

(2008)

This paper examines changes taking place in village government in three districts on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia that were severely affected by the December 26, 2004 Asian earthquake and tsunami. The paper is based upon findings of the Aceh Community Assistance Research Project, a multi-donor supported qualitative social research project designed to identify and better understand the factors that supported and/or constrained recovery and redevelopment in communities in Aceh in the wake of this large-scale natural disaster.

Cover page of Hmong For Beginners Part 4

Hmong For Beginners Part 4

(1995)

"Hmong For Beginners" was written by Annie Jaisser and her co-authors (Martha Ratliff, Elizabeth Riddle, David Strecker, Lopao Vang and Lyfu Vang) from materials they developed in the 1980s when Hmong was first being introduced as a language of instruction for the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI). The book was published by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berleley in 1995 and is now out of print. This electronic version is intended to make the materials available to those interested in the Hmong language but with limited access to print materials about the language.

Cover page of Hmong For Beginners Part I

Hmong For Beginners Part I

(1995)

"Hmong For Beginners" was written by Annie Jaisser and her co-authors from materials they developed in the 1980s when Hmong was first being introduced as a language of instruction for the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI). The book was published by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berleley in 1995 and is now out of print. This electronic version is intended to make the materials available to those interested in the Hmong language but with limited access to print materials about the language.

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Cover page of Hmong For Beginners Appendices

Hmong For Beginners Appendices

(1995)

"Hmong For Beginners" was written by Annie Jaisser and her co-authors (Martha Ratliff, Elizabeth Riddle, David Strecker, Lopao Vang and Lyfu Vang) from materials they developed in the 1980s when Hmong was first being introduced as a language of instruction for the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI). The book was published by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berleley in 1995 and is now out of print. This electronic version is intended to make the materials available to those interested in the Hmong language but with limited access to print materials about the language.

Cover page of Hmong For Beginners Part 7

Hmong For Beginners Part 7

(1995)

"Hmong For Beginners" was written by Annie Jaisser and her co-authors (Martha Ratliff, Elizabeth Riddle, David Strecker, Lopao Vang and Lyfu Vang) from materials they developed in the 1980s when Hmong was first being introduced as a language of instruction for the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI). The book was published by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berleley in 1995 and is now out of print. This electronic version is intended to make the materials available to those interested in the Hmong language but with limited access to print materials about the language.

Cover page of Hmong For Beginners Part 5 Nouns

Hmong For Beginners Part 5 Nouns

(1995)

"Hmong For Beginners" was written by Annie Jaisser and her co-authors (Martha Ratliff, Elizabeth Riddle, David Strecker, Lopao Vang and Lyfu Vang) from materials they developed in the 1980s when Hmong was first being introduced as a language of instruction for the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI). The book was published by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berleley in 1995 and is now out of print. This electronic version is intended to make the materials available to those interested in the Hmong language but with limited access to print materials about the language.