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Cover page of Proceedings of the Conference on Space Monitoring of Global Change

Proceedings of the Conference on Space Monitoring of Global Change

(1992)

Taken from the content of the October 1992 meeting on Space Monitoring and Global Change, the contents of this IGCC paper range from means of assuring global cooperation in earth observation, potential systems and the practical difficulties of assembling and managing such systems.

Cover page of Coming Detractions: Notes on the Right's Mobilization against the New Detente, Working Paper No. 20, Second Conference on Discourse: Peace, Security, and International Society

Coming Detractions: Notes on the Right's Mobilization against the New Detente, Working Paper No. 20, Second Conference on Discourse: Peace, Security, and International Society

(1989)

What follows the Cold War? Even the fact that the question can be asked isastounding.  Shall the sequel be "peaceful competition" (Gorbachev), "cold peace and peaceful competition" (The New York Times editorial of August 10, 1987), "stable coexistence" (the American Committee on U. S.-Soviet Relations, including Arthur Macy Cox, William Colby, and George Ball)- or, grudgingly, "steps ... to reconcile vital U. S. and Soviet interests" (Henry Kissinger and Cyrus Vance)? There is dispute and confusion in both camps over what the new relationship is, what to call it. As the American establishment reorganizes its understanding of the world, theAmerican right is not silent. It is therefore useful to monitor the right's reactions to East-West rapprochement. In these notes, I look at the American right's responses to the East-West relaxation marked by the Washington and Moscow summits and the signing of the INF treaty. The discourse of the right in the first half of 1988 offers a preview of how it may be expected to react during the years to come.

Cover page of Cognitive-Linguistic-Organizational Aspects of Field Research in International Relations. Working Paper No. 5, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security and International Society

Cognitive-Linguistic-Organizational Aspects of Field Research in International Relations. Working Paper No. 5, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security and International Society

(1988)

If we need a new language of national and international politics in order to think differently so as to cope with the dangers of a nuclear world, we also need a new language of policy analysis to examine the structures and processes by which defense policy in general, and nuclear policy in particular, is made. What is needed, as a start, is a new lexicon of basic terms derived from language and discourse but applied to the policy process. We might then begin to develop this new vocabulary into an effective critique of defense decision making in the modern or indeed, the post-modern state. 

Cover page of The Concept of Security and International Relations Theory, Working Paper No. 3, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security and International Society

The Concept of Security and International Relations Theory, Working Paper No. 3, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security and International Society

(1988)

The participation of states in a wide range of processes--economic, military, tecnological, cultural, and political--produces ever more intense forms of insecurity on many dimensions. This working paper explores some of the assumptions that underlie conventional discourse on national securityand how they intersect with modern international relations theory.

Cover page of Decoding Nuclear Winter: Has War Lost Its Name? Working Paper No. 11, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

Decoding Nuclear Winter: Has War Lost Its Name? Working Paper No. 11, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

The concept of a "nuclear winter" has effected a turn in the discourse on nuclear war, which had long focused on imagery related to the initial blast and immediate after-effects. The paper discusses the origin of the nuclear winter theory and how it has influenced the nuclear debate.

Cover page of MEND: A Nurturing Voice in the Nuclear Arms Debate, Working Paper No. 13, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

MEND: A Nurturing Voice in the Nuclear Arms Debate, Working Paper No. 13, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

A survey of the work and role of Nuclear Disarmament bodies such as Mothers Embracing Nuclear Disarmament (MEND) and their means of influencing the Nuclear Issue in the west. Based on the assumption that nuclear wars are unwinnable, MEND and similar groups arose during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s to attempt and influence policy from within nations.

Cover page of Critical Discourse Moments and Critical Discourse Analysis: Towards a Methodology, Working Paper No. 7, First International Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

Critical Discourse Moments and Critical Discourse Analysis: Towards a Methodology, Working Paper No. 7, First International Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

One aim of this paper is to begin to face the problem of how to relate an ethical, polltical, and critical perspective to the rational-technical means of analysis and description that have been developed by modern linguists.

The second (and principal) question that this paper seeks to pursue is the following. Given that any utterance is a highly complex event in which wording, phrasing, and text-organisation fulfill multiple and simultaneous functions, what details is it possible to pin down in a text in such a way that it is rational to make claims about and critiques of ideological or distorted communication?

Cover page of Reykjavik: The Breach and Repair of the Pure War Script, Working Paper No. 12, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

Reykjavik: The Breach and Repair of the Pure War Script, Working Paper No. 12, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

This document examines the fundamental changes in negotiating techniques and posturing by the United States and USSR that appeared in the days following the Reykjavik conference on nuclear arms. Predictions and prospects follow.

Cover page of The Social Construction of the "Soviet Threat": A Study in the Politics of Representation, Working Paper No. 10, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

The Social Construction of the "Soviet Threat": A Study in the Politics of Representation, Working Paper No. 10, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

"The Soviet threat" has provided a frame of reference for American politics since shortlyafter the end of World War II. Demonstrating, measuring, and responding to "the threat" have been subjects of intense concern and debate. The reality of "the threat" has been taken for granted. The paper examines the origins and reproduction of the Soviet threat" in American politics. This is not an analysis of whether or not the threat is or has been "real." Rather, it is a study of how Americans have come to regard it as real. The distinction is crucial: we are dealing with the sociology of knowledge and the politics of representation. We are interested in seeing how and why a society constructs an enemy.

Cover page of Clausewitz: A Mind Under Arms, Working Paper No. 6, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

Clausewitz: A Mind Under Arms, Working Paper No. 6, First Annual Conference on Discourse, Peace, Security, and International Society

(1988)

An critique of the applicability and influence of Clausewitz's On War to the national security policies of the Reagan era.