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Anthropometric measures, body mass index, and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan).

  • Author(s): Arslan, Alan A
  • Helzlsouer, Kathy J
  • Kooperberg, Charles
  • Shu, Xiao-Ou
  • Steplowski, Emily
  • Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
  • Fuchs, Charles S
  • Gross, Myron D
  • Jacobs, Eric J
  • Lacroix, Andrea Z
  • Petersen, Gloria M
  • Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z
  • Zheng, Wei
  • Albanes, Demetrius
  • Amundadottir, Laufey
  • Bamlet, William R
  • Barricarte, Aurelio
  • Bingham, Sheila A
  • Boeing, Heiner
  • Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
  • Buring, Julie E
  • Chanock, Stephen J
  • Clipp, Sandra
  • Gaziano, J Michael
  • Giovannucci, Edward L
  • Hankinson, Susan E
  • Hartge, Patricia
  • Hoover, Robert N
  • Hunter, David J
  • Hutchinson, Amy
  • Jacobs, Kevin B
  • Kraft, Peter
  • Lynch, Shannon M
  • Manjer, Jonas
  • Manson, Joann E
  • McTiernan, Anne
  • McWilliams, Robert R
  • Mendelsohn, Julie B
  • Michaud, Dominique S
  • Palli, Domenico
  • Rohan, Thomas E
  • Slimani, Nadia
  • Thomas, Gilles
  • Tjønneland, Anne
  • Tobias, Geoffrey S
  • Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
  • Virtamo, Jarmo
  • Wolpin, Brian M
  • Yu, Kai
  • Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
  • Patel, Alpa V
  • Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)
  • et al.

Published Web Location

http://10.0.3.233/archinternmed.2010.63
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. METHODS:Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, > or = 35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS:In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; P(trend) < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; P(trend) < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; P(trend) = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; P(trend) = .003) but less so in men. CONCLUSIONS:These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

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