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Pre-existing Psychiatric Illness is Associated With Increased Risk of Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

  • Author(s): Nayeri, Arash
  • Rafla-Yuan, Eric
  • Farber-Eger, Eric
  • Blair, Marcia
  • Ziaeian, Boback
  • Cadeiras, Martin
  • McPherson, John A
  • Wells, Quinn S
  • et al.
Abstract

BACKGROUND:The increased prevalence of psychiatric illness among patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) has been previously described. OBJECTIVES:We sought to assess the effect of pre-existing psychiatric illness on clinical outcomes following the diagnosis of TC. METHODS:Adults diagnosed with TC at Vanderbilt University Medical Center between 1999 and 2015 were included in the study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify any pre-existing mood, anxiety, or schizophrenia-spectrum illness before TC presentation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to test for independent association of pre-existing psychiatric illness with 30-day mortality and recurrent TC; Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to evaluate for association with long-term mortality. RESULTS:Among 306 patients diagnosed with TC during the study period, 114 (37%) had a pre-existing psychiatric illness. In all, 43 (14%) and 88 (29%) patients died within 30 days of index diagnosis and as of last medical record review, respectively. Of the 269 who survived their index hospitalization, 19 (7%) had a confirmed recurrent episode of TC. In multivariable analyses, pre-existing psychiatric illness was not associated with increased 30-day (P = 0.320) or long-term (P = 0.621) mortality. Pre-existing psychiatric illness was associated with higher risk of recurrent TC (odds ratio = 7.44, 95% CI: 2.30-24.01, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS:Pre-existing psychiatric illness was associated with an increased risk of recurrent TC. No significant association was noted between pre-existing psychiatric illness and survival.

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