Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

UCLA

UCLA Previously Published Works bannerUCLA

Pre-existing Psychiatric Illness is Associated With Increased Risk of Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

  • Author(s): Nayeri, Arash
  • Rafla-Yuan, Eric
  • Farber-Eger, Eric
  • Blair, Marcia
  • Ziaeian, Boback
  • Cadeiras, Martin
  • McPherson, John A
  • Wells, Quinn S
  • et al.
Abstract

Background

The increased prevalence of psychiatric illness among patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) has been previously described.

Objectives

We sought to assess the effect of pre-existing psychiatric illness on clinical outcomes following the diagnosis of TC.

Methods

Adults diagnosed with TC at Vanderbilt University Medical Center between 1999 and 2015 were included in the study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify any pre-existing mood, anxiety, or schizophrenia-spectrum illness before TC presentation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to test for independent association of pre-existing psychiatric illness with 30-day mortality and recurrent TC; Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to evaluate for association with long-term mortality.

Results

Among 306 patients diagnosed with TC during the study period, 114 (37%) had a pre-existing psychiatric illness. In all, 43 (14%) and 88 (29%) patients died within 30 days of index diagnosis and as of last medical record review, respectively. Of the 269 who survived their index hospitalization, 19 (7%) had a confirmed recurrent episode of TC. In multivariable analyses, pre-existing psychiatric illness was not associated with increased 30-day (P = 0.320) or long-term (P = 0.621) mortality. Pre-existing psychiatric illness was associated with higher risk of recurrent TC (odds ratio = 7.44, 95% CI: 2.30-24.01, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Pre-existing psychiatric illness was associated with an increased risk of recurrent TC. No significant association was noted between pre-existing psychiatric illness and survival.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
Current View