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A Method to Measure the Rate of Glaucomatous Visual Field Change.

  • Author(s): Caprioli, Joseph;
  • Mohamed, Lilian;
  • Morales, Esteban;
  • Rabiolo, Alessandro;
  • Sears, Nathaniel;
  • Pradtana, Hirunpatravong;
  • Alizadeh, Reza;
  • Yu, Fei;
  • Afifi, Abdelmonem A;
  • Coleman, Anne L;
  • Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros
  • et al.
Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method to measure the rate of glaucomatous visual field (VF) deterioration and to identify fast progressors.

Methods

Retrospective, longitudinal, observational study of 8486 eyes of 4610 glaucomatous patients with ≥6 VFs and ≥3 years of follow-up. A Glaucoma Rate Index (GRI) was calculated. VF locations were partitioned into exponential decay or exponential improvement models. A pointwise rate of change (PRC) was estimated with an exponential fit and expressed as the percent/year change of the age- and location-matched normal perimetric range, presented as a spatially conserved VF map. PRCs were summed and normalized with boundary rates set by simulated decaying and improving VF series on a scale of -100 to +100, respectively.

Results

A total of 89,704 VF examinations with 425,039 test location series was used. Median follow-up and number of VFs/eye were 9.7 years and 9 VFs, respectively. Initial and final mean deviations (±SD) were -4.2 (±5.2) and -5.7 (±6.4) dB. The proportions of test locations designated as decayed, improved, and unchanged were 13%, 4%, and 83%, respectively. Mean PRCs for decay, improvement, and no change were -3.7 (±4.7)%/y, 2.5 (±2.6)%/y, and -0.5 (±2.1)%/y, respectively. The number of eyes with negative and positive GRIs was 5802 (68%) and 2390 eyes (28%), respectively. The proportion of eyes defined as fast progressors was 6.8%.

Conclusions

GRI provides a robust measure of glaucomatous VF change, operates without discontinuity over the entire perimetric range, and can be used to identify fast progressors.

Translational relevance

This study describes a novel method that can help the clinician to determine VF progression.

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