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What factors account for hormone replacement therapy prescribing frequency?

  • Author(s): Newton, KM
  • LaCroix, AZ
  • Buist, DS
  • Anderson, LA
  • Delaney, K
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-5122(01)00185-2
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to compare hormone replacement therapy (HRT) prescribing frequency to provider characteristics, attitudes and beliefs about menopause and HRT.

Methods

There was a mailed survey of providers at a large staff-model HMO in Washington state. Participants included 250 family practice physicians, 22 gynecologists, and 13 women's health care specialists and nurse midwives (83% response rate). The primary outcome, "HRT prescribing frequency" (derived from automated pharmacy and visit data) was defined as: the total number of estrogen prescriptions written by the provider and filled by women aged 50-80 years during the 12 months prior to the survey, divided by the number of visits made to the provider by women aged 50-80 years during that same 12-month period. Covariates included provider characteristics and beliefs about menopause and HRT. Logistic regression was used to distinguish providers in the upper 40% versus the lower 60% of HRT prescribing frequency.

Results

Controlling for age and practice type, HRT prescribing frequency was lower among men than women providers (odds ratio [OR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.65), higher among providers who agreed (vs. disagreed or neutral) that a convincing scientific case has been made that HRT prevents heart disease (OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.53-4.61), and higher among those in the upper tertile vs. lower tertiles of an HRT encouragement scale (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.29-4.85).

Conclusions

Female providers and providers with positive attitudes toward HRT are the most likely to prescribe it.

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