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Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Loaded with Curcumin-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for Angiogenesis in Bone Tissue Engineering

  • Author(s): Daya, Radha
  • Advisor(s): Liu, Huinan
  • et al.
Abstract

Tissue engineering, the combination of cells, scaffolding materials, and biochemical signals is being extensively researched for tissue generation and regeneration. The potential to generate tissue and organs can combat the limited availability of organ and tissue donors. To guarantee successful tissue engraftment, a sufficient availability of oxygen and nutrients must be provided. This can be done by adding angiogenic potential to therapy. The expansion of existing vasculature to site of repair can increase success rates of transplant and engraftment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can allow bone repair and regeneration and also secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays an important role in blood vessel formation and endothelial cell recruitment. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels provide a 3D microenvironment that mimics in vivo conditions and enhances cell viability and function. Iron oxide magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown to maintain scaffold dexterity while also enhancing cell alignment, viability, and function. Curcumin is a naturally occurring protein that is being studied for wound healing and angiogenic properties. Curcumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in a hyaluronic acid hydrogel were evaluated in this thesis. The nanoparticles and magnetic hydrogel were synthesized and characterized. Cell adhesion and viability studies were performed with the materials, and post-culture media was evaluated for changes of VEGF release in samples with developed materials and controls. Results suggested the hyaluronic acid hydrogels and curcumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles allowed for enhanced cell adhesion and morphology, and increased the total amount of VEGF production by BMSCs.

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