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Exploratory Study of Psychosocial Therapies with Text Messages to Mobile Phones in Groups of Vulnerable Immigrant Women.

  • Author(s): García, Yolanda
  • Ferrás, Carlos
  • Rocha, Álvaro
  • Aguilera, Adrián
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31280404
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

Various experimental studies on psychosocial therapy have been carried out through text messages with groups of people suffering from depression, anxiety, alcoholism, addictions, etc., but without distinguishing between men and women or highly vulnerable groups such as immigrants. We present an exploratory study of a mobile communication system which intends to improve the mental, physical and social health of a group of vulnerable immigrant women in Spain (n = 71), distinguishing between an intervention group and a non-equivalent control group. We sent automatic text messages (SMS) to the mobile phones of an intervention group formed by immigrant women who used the social services (n = 44). During a 26-day intervention period, the women received 4 daily automatic text messages on their phones, at a predetermined time. We measured mood and depression symptoms at the beginning and end of the intervention, and analysed the qualitative data to determine the acceptance level of a remote message program. The mood and depression symptoms were measured with the personal health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and were significantly better in the intervention group; they evolved from an initial 9.4 (DS = 6.4, range 1-25) to a 5.0 score at the end of the message period (DS = 4.8); with a significant difference (t (44) = 2.01, p = 7.80). Most women stated that the messages had improved their mood (86.3%), which made them feel more connected to their social environment (65.9%) and that they would like to continue receiving more messages (86.6%).

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