Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley Previously Published Works bannerUC Berkeley
Cover page of How sugar-sweetened beverage tax revenues are being used in the United States.

How sugar-sweetened beverage tax revenues are being used in the United States.

(2021)

We sought to describe how revenues from sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) excise taxes in 7 U.S. cities are being allocated, who is benefiting from these investments, and whether allocations are consistent with the original intent of tax legislation. We collected information from public documents and key informants about allocations in the most recent fiscal year available (ranging from 2018 to 2021). Across the 7 U.S. cities with taxes, the average annual revenue from SSB taxes totaled $133.9 M. In the fiscal year studied, cities allocated a total of $133.2 M in SSB tax revenues. Human and community capital investments totaled $89.6 M (67% of all allocations) funding early childhood development, community infrastructure improvements, and youth and workforce development. Health-related investments totaled $36.9 M (28% of total allocations), funding access to healthy foods and beverages; support for physical activity opportunities; promotion of overall physical, mental or social health and wellbeing; health and nutrition education; chronic-disease prevention and management; and reducing SSB consumption. In the 3 cities that specified how tax revenues would be spent, allocations were consistent with promised uses of revenues. In addition, 85% of aggregated revenues ($112.9 M) were targeted to support work and programs in impacted communities (communities that experience health inequities, discrimination and exclusion). SSB tax revenues are supporting initiatives to improve community health, develop human and community capital, and advance equity. These investments may yield additional health benefits beyond those resulting from lower SSB consumption. Consistent tracking and public reporting on revenue allocations would increase transparency and accountability.

Cover page of Molecular pharming to support human life on the moon, mars, and beyond.

Molecular pharming to support human life on the moon, mars, and beyond.

(2021)

Space missions have always assumed that the risk of spacecraft malfunction far outweighs the risk of human system failure. This assumption breaks down for longer duration exploration missions and exposes vulnerabilities in space medical systems. Space agencies can no longer reduce the majority of the human health and performance risks through crew members selection process and emergency re-supply or evacuation. No mature medical solutions exist to address this risk. With recent advances in biotechnology, there is promise for lessening this risk by augmenting a space pharmacy with a biologically-based space foundry for the on-demand manufacturing of high-value medical products. Here we review the challenges and opportunities of molecular pharming, the production of pharmaceuticals in plants, as the basis of a space medical foundry to close the risk gap in current space medical systems. Plants have long been considered to be an important life support object in space and can now also be viewed as programmable factories in space. Advances in molecular pharming-based space foundries will have widespread applications in promoting simple and accessible pharmaceutical manufacturing on Earth.

Combined Micromagnetic and Finite-element simulation of Integrated Mag- netic Inductors for Improve DC-DC Voltage Regulator Energy Efficiency and Manufacturing Yie

(2021)

Ferric collaborated with personnel at Berkeley Lab to build an HPCenhanced computational tool for simultaneously solving micromagnetic and electromagnetic equations, in order to analyze thin film magnetic inductors. The tool improves the accuracy and speed of the analysis, and results in an overall improvement in power converter performance and time-to-market.

Evidence for Higgs boson decays to a low-mass dilepton system and a photon in pp collisions at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

(2021)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying into a photon and a pair of electrons or muons with an invariant mass $m_{\ell\ell} < 30$ GeV is presented. The analysis is performed using 139 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data, produced by the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and collected by the ATLAS experiment. Evidence for the $H \rightarrow \ell \ell \gamma$ process is found with a significance of 3.2$\sigma$ over the background-only hypothesis, compared to an expected significance of 2.1$\sigma$. The best-fit value of the signal strength parameter, defined as the ratio of the observed signal yield to the one expected in the Standard Model, is $\mu = 1.5 \pm 0.5$. The Higgs boson production cross-section times the $H \rightarrow\ell\ell\gamma$ branching ratio for $m_{\ell\ell} <$ 30 GeV is determined to be 8.7 $^{+2.8}_{-2.7}$ fb.

Cover page of DO YOU KNOW THAT I KNOW THAT YOU KNOW. . . ? HIGHER-ORDER BELIEFS IN SURVEY DATA

DO YOU KNOW THAT I KNOW THAT YOU KNOW. . . ? HIGHER-ORDER BELIEFS IN SURVEY DATA

(2021)

Abstract We implement a new survey of firms, focusing on their higher-order macroeconomic expectations. The survey provides a novel set of stylized facts regarding the relationship between first-order and higher-order expectations of economic agents, including how they adjust their beliefs in response to a variety of information treatments. We show how these facts can be used to calibrate key parameters of noisy-information models with infinite regress as well as to test predictions made by this class of models. We also consider a range of extensions to the basic noisy-information model that can potentially better reconcile theory and empirics. Although some extensions like level-k thinking are unsuccessful, incorporating heterogeneous long-run priors can address the empirical shortcomings of the basic noisy-information model.

Cover page of Measurement of angular and momentum distributions of charged particles within and around jets in Pb+Pb and pp collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector

Measurement of angular and momentum distributions of charged particles within and around jets in Pb+Pb and pp collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV with the ATLAS detector

(2021)
Cover page of R&amp;D AND IMPLEMENTATION OUTCOMES FROM THE U.S.-INDIA BILATERAL CENTER FOR BUILDING ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

R&D AND IMPLEMENTATION OUTCOMES FROM THE U.S.-INDIA BILATERAL CENTER FOR BUILDING ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

(2021)

This paper explores the role of international partnerships to facilitate low-energy building design, construction, and operations. We present the strategic approach, joint research and development outcomes, and implementation activities of a unique U.S.-India program on buildings energy efficiency, the Center for Building Energy Research and Development. We discuss the collaboration successes in both countries despite their dissimilar building contexts, implementation challenges and opportunities. We highlight a range of R&D outcomes, such as novel tools and technologies developed and tested by the joint teams, with their technical energy savings potential, as well as results of capacity building and technology demonstrations. A deep-dive into key new scientific methods around building energy monitoring and benchmarking that could have a significant impact on high-performanceof buildings in both countries is also provided. Finally, in addition to joint R&D successes, pathways to deployment, and lessons learned are discussed as key takeaways.