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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Open Access Policy Deposits

This series is automatically populated with publications deposited by UC Berkeley Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning researchers in accordance with the University of California’s open access policies. For more information see Open Access Policy Deposits and the UC Publication Management System.

Cover page of Inventing Venice:An Urban and Environmental Innovation Model from the Lagoon City

Inventing Venice:An Urban and Environmental Innovation Model from the Lagoon City

(2019)

Innovation in physical urban infrastructure is a vital component of city making in an era of sea level rise, climate change, and rapid urbanization. Venice pioneered an urban and environmental innovation model in the 14th and 15th century, successfully negotiating the cities complex geography and the sociotechnical processes that characterized Renaissance urbanism. A review of early inventor rights issued in the city suggests that the process of patent innovation facilitated urbanization of the Venetian lagoon through development of advanced drainage, dredge, irrigation, and reclamation infrastructure, essential to the city’s survival. In addition to granting patents for new inventions, the Venetian government established expert review for proposed inventions, supported prototyping and testing for untried technologies, and used patent rights to attract experts with novel inventions from across Italy and Europe. These processes, in addition to the extensive dossier of patents issued in Venice, substantiate the primacy of innovation in the process of urbanization and revel an urban innovation model. Patent law later spread along Venetian trade routes through Europe, where they were also employed in economic modernization, and the construction of urban and regional infrastructure. Interestingly, similar process can later be observed throughout Europe and the United States as patent rights were constitutionalized.

Cover page of The geographical dimensions of patent innovation: history, precedents, praxis, and pedagogy, in an expanded field of landscape technology.

The geographical dimensions of patent innovation: history, precedents, praxis, and pedagogy, in an expanded field of landscape technology.

(2019)

Innovation has geographical dimensions, ranging from site and building technology, to infrastructure and environmental systems. As the allied professions of environmental design expand disciplinary scope beyond aesthetics into questions of territory, landscape infrastructure, performance-based design, and issues related to climate adaptation and the Anthropocene, an expanded concept of technology and innovation becomes essential to address new pedagogical adjectives and praxis. One of the most effective ways to track technological change in a specific sector of technology is through patent innovation. The global patent archive is the world’s largest technological dossier. An estimated 90 million patents have been granted globally, and the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) alone has issued more than 10 million patents since 1790. A unique subset of these inventions relate to site and building technology as well as large-scale environmental systems such as rivers, coasts, and cities. Since patent innovation is an ongoing process, patent documents provide insights into the ever-evolving sectors of technology, which may be understood as an expanded field of landscape technologies that define site, cities, and regions. This paper explores the histories of patent innovation related to the physical built environment and argues for an expanded definition of “Landscape Technology”. The paper also includes examples of New pedagogical approaches that integrate patent innovation studies into environmental design curriculum, and a discussion of strategies for implementing novel technologies and patent innovation studies into professional design projects.

Cover page of Design and Planning Opportunities for the Big Sur Region - UC Berkeley Landscape Architecture

Design and Planning Opportunities for the Big Sur Region - UC Berkeley Landscape Architecture

(2023)

WILDERNESS / UX - DESIGN RESEARCH “Design & Planning Opportunities for the Big Sur Region” THIS RESEARCH WAS SUPPORTED BY THE PEDER SATHER CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY AT UC BERKELEY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING UC BERKELEY LDARCH 203 - FALL 2023 Isaiah Rapko Olivia Jones Lynsey Coke-Ferreira Aishwarya Dharmarajan Eli Demosthenes Lulu Liu Dongni Ma Luis Lu Jie Han Aishvarya Dubey Alex Jordan Claudia Lamberty Instructor: Richard

Cover page of The canal and the pool: infrastructures of abundance and the invention of the modern desert

The canal and the pool: infrastructures of abundance and the invention of the modern desert

(2022)

Modernist ontologies of water physically materialise in Phoenix’s landscape: over 100 miles of canals convey water to the suburban grid, where thousands of gallons are piped into backyard swimming pools. The canal and pool are thus joined in architectural folly to move, hold, and control water in the service of sustaining the belief that dry ecologies are but supply chain problems in need of engineering solutions. These typologies reveal longstanding entanglements between the promises of modernity and aridland urbanism; and they further amplify the immense challenge of transitioning away from modern water infrastructure in the face of climate change. By using the canal and the pool as signifiers of the insidious entanglements between modernity, growth, and aridland urbanism, this article advances an historical examination of Phoenix that destabilises tropes of water scarcity as a problem to be solved but which has also created cultural perceptions of abundant water.

Cover page of Strategic basin and delta planning increases the resilience of the Mekong Delta under future uncertainty

Strategic basin and delta planning increases the resilience of the Mekong Delta under future uncertainty

(2021)

The climate resilience of river deltas is threatened by rising sea levels, accelerated land subsidence, and reduced sediment supply from contributing river basins. Yet, these uncertain and rapidly changing threats are rarely considered in conjunction. Here we provide an integrated assessment, on basin and delta scales, to identify key planning levers for increasing the climate resilience of the Mekong Delta. We find, first, that 23 to 90% of this unusually productive delta might fall below sea level by 2100, with the large uncertainty driven mainly by future management of groundwater pumping and associated land subsidence. Second, maintaining sediment supply from the basin is crucial under all scenarios for maintaining delta land and enhancing the climate resilience of the system. We then use a bottom-up approach to identify basin development scenarios that are compatible with maintaining sediment supply at current levels. This analysis highlights, third, that strategic placement of hydropower dams will be more important for maintaining sediment supply than either projected increases in sediment yields or improved sediment management at individual dams. Our results demonstrate 1) the need for integrated planning across basin and delta scales, 2) the role of river sediment management as a nature-based solution to increase delta resilience, and 3) global benefits from strategic basin management to maintain resilient deltas, especially under uncertain and changing conditions.