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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press

The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press publishes high quality peer reviewed books on archaeological surveys and excavations world-wide, theoretical debates, and specialized themes discussed in the Advanced Cotsen Seminars. These publications are listed on our website http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/browse-books/viewall and can be purchased through our distributor, the University of Mexico Press (http://www.unmpress.com/). Out of print books that are older than five years are gradually made available for free download here.

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Cover page of The South American Camelids: An Expanded and Corrected Edition

The South American Camelids: An Expanded and Corrected Edition

(2009)

One of the most significant differences between the New World’s major areas of high culture is that Mesoamerica had no beasts of burden and wool, while the Andes had both. Four members of the camelid family—wild guanacos and vicuñas, and domestic llamas and alpacas—were native to the Andes. South American peoples relied on these animals for meat and wool, and as beasts of burden to transport goods all over the Andes.

In this book, Duccio Bonavia tackles major questions about these camelids, from their domestication to their distribution at the time of the Spanish conquest. One of Bonavia’s hypotheses is that the arrival of the Europeans and their introduced Old World animals forced the Andean camelids away from the Pacific coast, creating the (mistaken) impression that camelids were exclusively high-altitude animals. Bonavia also addresses the diseases of camelids and their population density, suggesting that the original camelid populations suffered from a different type of mange than that introduced by the Europeans. This new mange, he believes, was one of the causes behind the great morbidity of camelids in Colonial times. In terms of domestication, while Bonavia believes that the major centers must have been the puna zone intermediate zones, he adds that the process should not be seen as restricted to a single environmental zone.

Bonavia’s landmark study of the South American camelids is now available for the first time in English. This new edition features an updated analysis and comprehensive bibliography. In the Spanish edition of this book, Bonavia lamented the fact that the zooarchaeological data from R. S. MacNeish’s Ayacucho Project had yet to be published. In response, the Ayacucho’s Project’s faunal analysts, Elizabeth S. Wing and Kent V. Flannery, have added appendices on the Ayacucho results to this English edition. This book will be of broad interest to archaeologists, zoologists, social anthropologists, ethnohistorians, and a wide range of students.

Cover page of Us and Them: Archaeology and Ethnicity in the Andes

Us and Them: Archaeology and Ethnicity in the Andes

(2005)

This volume brings together a corpus of scholars whose work collectively represents a significant advancement in the study of prehistoric ethnicity in the Andean region. The assembled research represents an outstanding collection of theoretical and methodological approaches, and conveys recent discoveries in several subfields of prehistoric Andean anthropology, including spatial archaeology, mortuary archaeology, textile studies, ceramic analysis, and biological anthropology. Many of the authors in this volume apply novel research techniques, while others wield more established approaches in original ways. Although the research presented in this volume has occurred in the Andean region, many of the novel methods applied will be applicable to other geographic regions, and it is hoped that this research will stimulate others to pursue future innovative work in the prehistoric study of ethnic identification.

Cover page of Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-1

Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-1

(2005)

Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-I is the first in a series of edited volumes that reports on recent research in the south central Andes. Volume I contains 18 chapters that cover the entire range of human settlement in the region, from the Early Archaic to the early Colonial Period. This book contains both short research reports as well as longer synthetic essays on work conducted over the last decade. It will be a critical resource for scholars working in the central Andes and adjacent areas.

Cover page of Plain of Phaistos: Cycles of Social Complexity in the Mesara Region of Crete

Plain of Phaistos: Cycles of Social Complexity in the Mesara Region of Crete

(2005)

The volume presents the results on an interdisciplinary regional field project (1984 - 1987) carried out on the island Of Crete. This volume traces the changing patterns of settlement and cycles of social complexity from the Late Neolithic period to the present day within the heartland of the state of Phaistos. The authors and contributors publish geological, archaeological, environmental, botanical, historical and ethnographic studies that establish the regional identity of the Western Mesara. Using a combination of empirical, processual and post-processual theoretical approaches, the volume investigates a central problem - how and why did the Bronze Age and Classical states arise at Phaistos?

Cover page of Archaeological Research on the Islands of the Sun and Moon, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia: Final Results from the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka

Archaeological Research on the Islands of the Sun and Moon, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia: Final Results from the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka

(2004)

Beginning in 1994, the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka conducted a complete survey of the Islands of the Sun and Moon in southern Lake Titicaca, along with test excavations of important Inca, Tiwanaku, and pre-Tiwanaku sites. This book provides the final results of this work on one of the most important locations in the circum-Titicaca Basin, with detailed survey and excavation data indispensable for Andeanists and other scholars interested in the development of complex political, economic, and ritual systems in prehistory.

Cover page of Perspectives on Ancient Maya Rural Complexity

Perspectives on Ancient Maya Rural Complexity

(2003)

Settlement archaeology in the Maya area has focused much of its attention on the polar extremes of the settlement continuum. As a result of this urban/rural bias, a whole range of complex rural settlements remain under-explored. The chapters in this volume highlight the variable quality of these "middle level settlements".

Cover page of Prehistoric Sitagroi: Exavations in Northeast Greece, 1968-1970 Volume 2: The Final Report

Prehistoric Sitagroi: Exavations in Northeast Greece, 1968-1970 Volume 2: The Final Report

(2003)

Volume 2 presents the concluding research on Sitagroi, a prehistoric settlement mound in northeastern Greece, excavated between 1968 and 1970. This volume offers a detailed report on the plant remains along with a full treatment of craft and technology: artifacts of adornment; tools of bone and flaked stone; artifacts and tools of bone and ground and polished stone (and petrology); tools of the spinner, weaver and mat maker; pottery technology; metallurgy; and special clay finds such as seals, miniatures, and utensils. This rich presentation offers unparalleled insights into the life of the prehistoric inhabitants of the area. Sitagroi now becomes one of the most comprehensively published sites from prehistoric Europe and will be indispensable for all those concerned with European prehistory.

Cover page of Yeki bud, yeki nabud: Essays on the Archaeoogy of Iran in Honor of William M. Sumner

Yeki bud, yeki nabud: Essays on the Archaeoogy of Iran in Honor of William M. Sumner

(2003)

This volume is a collection of essays by colleagues, friends, and students of William M. Sumner in appreciation of his outstanding contribution to Iranian archaeology, especially to our archaeological knowledge of Fars, a center of Iranian civilization.